Next Article in Journal
A Comparative Evaluation of Hydromorphological Assessment Methods Applied in Rivers of Greece
Next Article in Special Issue
Advances in Evaporation and Evaporative Demand
Previous Article in Journal
Inferring Hydrological Information at the Regional Scale by Means of δ18O–δ2H Relationships: Insights from the Northern Italian Apennines
Previous Article in Special Issue
RASPOTION—A New Global PET Dataset by Means of Remote Monthly Temperature Data and Parametric Modelling
 
 
Article

Determinants of Evapotranspiration in Urban Rain Gardens: A Case Study with Lysimeters under Temperate Climate

1
Equipe TEAM, Centre d’Etudes et d’Expertise sur les Risques, l’Environnement, la Mobilité et l’Aménagement (Cerema), 12 rue Teisserenc de Bort, F 78190 Trappes, France
2
Division Etudes et Ingénierie, Direction de la Propreté et de l’Eau, Service Technique de l’Eau et de l’Assainissement (DPE-STEA), 27 rue du Commandeur, F 75014 Paris, France
3
Leesu, Ecole des Ponts, Université Paris Est Creteil, F 77455 Marne-la-Vallee, France
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Aristoteles Tegos
Hydrology 2022, 9(3), 42; https://doi.org/10.3390/hydrology9030042
Received: 31 January 2022 / Revised: 18 February 2022 / Accepted: 21 February 2022 / Published: 23 February 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Evaporation and Evaporative Demand)
Accurate evaluation of evapotranspiration (ET) flux is an important issue in sustainable urban drainage systems that target not only flow rate limitations, but also aim at the restoration of natural water balances. This is especially true in context where infiltration possibilities are limited. However, its assessment suffers from insufficient understanding. In this study, ET in 1 m3 pilot rain gardens were studied from eight lysimeters monitored for three years in Paris (France). Daily ET was calculated for each lysimeter based on a mass balance approach and the related uncertainties were assessed at ±0.42 to 0.58 mm. Results showed that for these lysimeters, ET is the major term in water budget (61 to 90% of the precipitations) with maximum values reaching 8–12 mm. Furthermore, the major determinants of ET are the existence or not of an internal water storage and the atmospheric factors. The vegetation type is a secondary determinant, with little difference between herbaceous and shrub configurations, maximum ET for spontaneous vegetation, and minimal values when vegetation was regularly removed. Shading of lysimeters by surroundings buildings is also important, leading to lower values. Finally, ET of lysimeters is higher than tested reference values (evaporimeter, FAO-56, and local Météo-France equations). View Full-Text
Keywords: evapotranspiration estimation; urban rain gardens; lysimeters; evapotranspiration models evapotranspiration estimation; urban rain gardens; lysimeters; evapotranspiration models
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Ouédraogo, A.A.; Berthier, E.; Durand, B.; Gromaire, M.-C. Determinants of Evapotranspiration in Urban Rain Gardens: A Case Study with Lysimeters under Temperate Climate. Hydrology 2022, 9, 42. https://doi.org/10.3390/hydrology9030042

AMA Style

Ouédraogo AA, Berthier E, Durand B, Gromaire M-C. Determinants of Evapotranspiration in Urban Rain Gardens: A Case Study with Lysimeters under Temperate Climate. Hydrology. 2022; 9(3):42. https://doi.org/10.3390/hydrology9030042

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ouédraogo, Ahmeda Assann, Emmanuel Berthier, Brigitte Durand, and Marie-Christine Gromaire. 2022. "Determinants of Evapotranspiration in Urban Rain Gardens: A Case Study with Lysimeters under Temperate Climate" Hydrology 9, no. 3: 42. https://doi.org/10.3390/hydrology9030042

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop