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Toxics, Volume 3, Issue 3 (September 2015) – 6 articles , Pages 249-341

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Review
Axonal Transport Impairment in Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy
Toxics 2015, 3(3), 322-341; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics3030322 - 07 Aug 2015
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 2380
Abstract
Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy (CIPN) is a dose-limiting side effect of several antineoplastic drugs which significantly reduces patients’ quality of life. Although different molecular mechanisms have been investigated, CIPN pathobiology has not been clarified yet. It has largely been recognized that Dorsal Root Ganglia [...] Read more.
Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy (CIPN) is a dose-limiting side effect of several antineoplastic drugs which significantly reduces patients’ quality of life. Although different molecular mechanisms have been investigated, CIPN pathobiology has not been clarified yet. It has largely been recognized that Dorsal Root Ganglia are the main targets of chemotherapy and that the longest nerves are the most damaged, together with fast axonal transport. Indeed, this bidirectional cargo-specific transport has a pivotal role in neuronal function and its impairment is involved in several neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental diseases. Literature data demonstrate that, despite different mechanisms of action, all antineoplastic agents impair the axonal trafficking to some extent and the severity of the neuropathy correlates with the degree of damage on this bidirectional transport. In this paper, we will examine the effect of the main old and new chemotherapeutic drug categories on axonal transport, with the aim of clarifying their potential mechanisms of action, and, if possible, of identifying neuroprotective strategies, based on the knowledge of the alterations induced by each drugs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Toxicities of Therapeutic Agents Used in Medicine)
Review
Current View in Platinum Drug Mechanisms of Peripheral Neurotoxicity
Toxics 2015, 3(3), 304-321; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics3030304 - 07 Aug 2015
Cited by 24 | Viewed by 2637
Abstract
Peripheral neurotoxicity is the dose-limiting factor for clinical use of platinum derivatives, a class of anticancer drugs which includes cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin. In particular cisplatin and oxaliplatin induce a severe peripheral neurotoxicity while carboplatin is less neurotoxic. The mechanisms proposed to explain [...] Read more.
Peripheral neurotoxicity is the dose-limiting factor for clinical use of platinum derivatives, a class of anticancer drugs which includes cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin. In particular cisplatin and oxaliplatin induce a severe peripheral neurotoxicity while carboplatin is less neurotoxic. The mechanisms proposed to explain these drugs’ neurotoxicity are dorsal root ganglia alteration, oxidative stress involvement, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Oxaliplatin also causes an acute and reversible neuropathy, supposed to be due by transient dysfunction of the voltage-gated sodium channels of sensory neurons. Recent studies suggest that individual genetic variation may play a role in the pathogenesis of platinum drug neurotoxicity. Even though all these mechanisms have been investigated, the pathogenesis is far from clearly defined. In this review we will summarize the current knowledge and the most up-to-date hypotheses on the mechanisms of platinum drug-induced peripheral neurotoxicity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Toxicities of Therapeutic Agents Used in Medicine)
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Review
An Overview of Bortezomib-Induced Neurotoxicity
Toxics 2015, 3(3), 294-303; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics3030294 - 27 Jul 2015
Cited by 30 | Viewed by 2558
Abstract
The boronic acid dipeptide bortezomib, able to induce tumor cell death by degradation of key proteins, is the first proteasome inhibitor drug to enter clinical practice. It is employed as first-line treatment in relapsed or resistant multiple myeloma (MM) patients. However, bortezomib often [...] Read more.
The boronic acid dipeptide bortezomib, able to induce tumor cell death by degradation of key proteins, is the first proteasome inhibitor drug to enter clinical practice. It is employed as first-line treatment in relapsed or resistant multiple myeloma (MM) patients. However, bortezomib often induces a dose-limiting toxicity in the form of painful sensory neuropathy, which can mainly be reduced by subcutaneous administration or dose modification. In this review we focus on the current understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of bortezomib-induced neuropathy to allow further studies in animal models and humans, including analysis of clinical and pharmacogenetic aspects, to optimize the treatment regimens. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Toxicities of Therapeutic Agents Used in Medicine)
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Review
Cisplatin-Induced Ototoxicity: Effects, Mechanisms and Protection Strategies
Toxics 2015, 3(3), 268-293; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics3030268 - 15 Jul 2015
Cited by 56 | Viewed by 3621
Abstract
Cisplatin is a highly effective chemotherapeutic agent that is widely used to treat solid organ malignancies. However, serious side effects have been associated with its use, such as bilateral, progressive, irreversible, dose-dependent neurosensory hearing loss. Current evidence indicates that cisplatin triggers the production [...] Read more.
Cisplatin is a highly effective chemotherapeutic agent that is widely used to treat solid organ malignancies. However, serious side effects have been associated with its use, such as bilateral, progressive, irreversible, dose-dependent neurosensory hearing loss. Current evidence indicates that cisplatin triggers the production of reactive oxygen species in target tissues in the inner ear. A variety of agents that protect against cisplatin-induced ototoxicity have been successfully tested in cell culture and animal models. However, many of them interfere with the therapeutic effect of cisplatin, and therefore are not suitable for systemic administration in clinical practice. Consequently, local administration strategies, namely intratympanic administration, have been developed to achieve otoprotection, without reducing the antitumoral effect of cisplatin. While a considerable amount of pre-clinical information is available, clinical data on treatments to prevent cisplatin ototoxicity are only just beginning to appear. This review summarizes clinical and experimental studies of cisplatin ototoxicity, and focuses on understanding its toxicity mechanisms, clinical repercussions and prevention strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Toxicities of Therapeutic Agents Used in Medicine)
Article
Modelling Short-Term Maximum Individual Exposure from Airborne Hazardous Releases in Urban Environments. Part ΙI: Validation of a Deterministic Model with Wind Tunnel Experimental Data
Toxics 2015, 3(3), 259-267; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics3030259 - 26 Jun 2015
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2567
Abstract
The capability to predict short-term maximum individual exposure is very important for several applications including, for example, deliberate/accidental release of hazardous substances, odour fluctuations or material flammability level exceedance. Recently, authors have proposed a simple approach relating maximum individual exposure to parameters such [...] Read more.
The capability to predict short-term maximum individual exposure is very important for several applications including, for example, deliberate/accidental release of hazardous substances, odour fluctuations or material flammability level exceedance. Recently, authors have proposed a simple approach relating maximum individual exposure to parameters such as the fluctuation intensity and the concentration integral time scale. In the first part of this study (Part I), the methodology was validated against field measurements, which are governed by the natural variability of atmospheric boundary conditions. In Part II of this study, an in-depth validation of the approach is performed using reference data recorded under truly stationary and well documented flow conditions. For this reason, a boundary-layer wind-tunnel experiment was used. The experimental dataset includes 196 time-resolved concentration measurements which detect the dispersion from a continuous point source within an urban model of semi-idealized complexity. The data analysis allowed the improvement of an important model parameter. The model performed very well in predicting the maximum individual exposure, presenting a factor of two of observations equal to 95%. For large time intervals, an exponential correction term has been introduced in the model based on the experimental observations. The new model is capable of predicting all time intervals giving an overall factor of two of observations equal to 100%. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Risk Assessment of Environmental Contaminants)
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Article
Modeling Short-Term Maximum Individual Exposure from Airborne Hazardous Releases in Urban Environments. Part I: Validation of a Deterministic Model with Field Experimental Data
Toxics 2015, 3(3), 249-258; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics3030249 - 25 Jun 2015
Viewed by 1901
Abstract
The release of airborne hazardous substances in the atmosphere has a direct effect on human health as, during the inhalation, an amount of concentration is inserted through the respiratory system into the human body, which can cause serious or even irreparable damage in [...] Read more.
The release of airborne hazardous substances in the atmosphere has a direct effect on human health as, during the inhalation, an amount of concentration is inserted through the respiratory system into the human body, which can cause serious or even irreparable damage in health. One of the key problems in such cases is the prediction of the maximum individual exposure. Current state of the art methods, which are based on the concentration cumulative distribution function and require the knowledge of the concentration variance and the intermittency factor, have limitations. Recently, authors proposed a deterministic approach relating maximum individual exposure to parameters such as the fluctuation intensity and the concentration integral time scale. The purpose of the first part of this study is to validate the deterministic approach with the extensive dataset of the MUST (Mock Urban Setting Test) field experiment. This dataset includes 81 trials, which practically cover various atmospheric conditions and stability classes and contains in total 4004 non-zero concentration sensor data with time resolutions of 0.01–0.02 s. The results strengthen the usefulness of the deterministic model in predicting short-term maximum individual exposure. Another important output is the estimation of the methodology uncertainty involved. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Risk Assessment of Environmental Contaminants)
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