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Article

Lectin Activity in Commonly Consumed Plant-Based Foods: Calling for Method Harmonization and Risk Assessment

1
Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy in Hradec Králové, Charles University, Heyrovského 1203, 500 05 Hradec Králové, Czech Republic
2
Plant Nutrients and Food Quality Research Group, Plant and Soil Science Section and Copenhagen Plant Science Centre, Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Thorvaldsensvej 40, 1871 Frederiksberg C, Denmark
3
Danish Veterinary and Food Administration, Soendervang 4, 4100 Ringsted, Denmark
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Susana Gonzalez-Manzano
Foods 2021, 10(11), 2796; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10112796
Received: 14 October 2021 / Revised: 5 November 2021 / Accepted: 11 November 2021 / Published: 13 November 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Plant Foods)
Lectins are ubiquitous proteins characterized through their ability to bind different types of carbohydrates. It is well known that active lectins from insufficiently prepared legumes can cause adverse human health effects. The objective of this study was to determine the activity of lectins in samples across plant families representing commercially available edible plants, and the feasibility of inactivating lectins through soaking and boiling. Lectins were extracted from the plant families Adoxaceae, Amaranthaceae, Cannabaceae, Fabaceae, Gramineae, Lamiaceae, Linaceae, Pedaliaceae, and Solanaceae. A hemagglutination assay based on non-treated or trypsin treated rabbit erythrocytes was used to measure the lectin activity. The results showed the highest lectin activity in species from the Fabaceae family and demonstrated that soaking and boiling have an effect on the levels of active lectins. This is the first large study that combines lectin activity obtained from two different assays with raw and processed edible plants. In addition, we examined the current risk assessment, and regulations necessary for an adequate official reporting of results. We encourage the scientific community to further explore this field and agree on harmonized methods for analysis and interpretation, and hope that our methodology can initiate this development. View Full-Text
Keywords: active lectins; disease; hemagglutination; lectins; legumes; plant-based foods; risk assessment active lectins; disease; hemagglutination; lectins; legumes; plant-based foods; risk assessment
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MDPI and ACS Style

Adamcová, A.; Laursen, K.H.; Ballin, N.Z. Lectin Activity in Commonly Consumed Plant-Based Foods: Calling for Method Harmonization and Risk Assessment. Foods 2021, 10, 2796. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10112796

AMA Style

Adamcová A, Laursen KH, Ballin NZ. Lectin Activity in Commonly Consumed Plant-Based Foods: Calling for Method Harmonization and Risk Assessment. Foods. 2021; 10(11):2796. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10112796

Chicago/Turabian Style

Adamcová, Anežka, Kristian H. Laursen, and Nicolai Z. Ballin. 2021. "Lectin Activity in Commonly Consumed Plant-Based Foods: Calling for Method Harmonization and Risk Assessment" Foods 10, no. 11: 2796. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10112796

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