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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

Inadequate Sampling Rates Can Undermine the Reliability of Ecological Interaction Estimation

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Instituto de Física Teórica, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Rua Dr. Bento Teobaldo Ferraz 271, 01140-070 São Paulo, Brazil
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Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto (FFCLRP), Universidade de São Paulo (USP), Avenida Bandeirantes 3900, 14040-901 Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil
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Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Technologia de Sistemas Complexos (INCT-SC), Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, Urca, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Math. Comput. Appl. 2019, 24(2), 48; https://doi.org/10.3390/mca24020048
Received: 28 March 2019 / Revised: 26 April 2019 / Accepted: 29 April 2019 / Published: 30 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dynamics Days Latin America and the Caribbean 2018)
Cycles in population dynamics are abundant in nature and are understood as emerging from the interaction among coupled species. When sampling is conducted at a slow rate compared to the population cycle period (aliasing effect), one is prone to misinterpretations. However, aliasing has been poorly addressed in coupled population dynamics. To illustrate the aliasing effect, the Lotka–Volterra model oscillatory regime is numerically sampled, creating prey–predator cycles. We show that inadequate sampling rates may produce inversions in the cause-effect relationship among other artifacts. More generally, slow acquisition rates may distort data interpretation and produce deceptive patterns and eventually leading to misinterpretations, as predators becoming preys. Experiments in coupled population dynamics should be designed that address the eventual aliasing effect. View Full-Text
Keywords: temporal aliasing effect; ecological methods; sampling rates; cyclic dynamics; predator–prey system; population biology temporal aliasing effect; ecological methods; sampling rates; cyclic dynamics; predator–prey system; population biology
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MDPI and ACS Style

Cabella, B.; Meloni, F.; Martinez, A.S. Inadequate Sampling Rates Can Undermine the Reliability of Ecological Interaction Estimation. Math. Comput. Appl. 2019, 24, 48.

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