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The Influence of Increased Prepregnancy Body Mass Index and Excessive Gestational Weight Gain on Pregnancy Course and Fetal and Maternal Perinatal Outcomes

1
Clinical Hospital Center “Dr. Dragiša Mišović”, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia
2
Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia
3
Obstetrics/Gynecology Clinic “Narodni front”, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia
4
Faculty of Dental Medicine, University of Belgrade, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia
5
Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Department, University Children’s Hospital, Tirsova 10, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Healthcare 2020, 8(4), 362; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8040362
Received: 28 August 2020 / Revised: 22 September 2020 / Accepted: 23 September 2020 / Published: 24 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Maternal and Pediatric Nutrition)
Background: The aim of our study was to assess the influence of prepregnancy Body Mass Index (BMI) changes as well as excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) on maternal and fetal perinatal parameters. Furthermore, we aimed to analyze the influence of increased prepregnancy BMI values and excessive GWG on neonatal early motoric development. Methods: The 203 eligible female participants were evaluated. Prepregnancy Body Mass Index (BMI) and excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) defined according to Institute of Medicine 2009 guidelines in the USA were assessed with tested maternal and fetal perinatal parameters and infants early motoric development (Alberta Infant Motor Scale—AIMS). Results: Significant predictors of increased prepregnancy BMI in perinatal period include: weight at delivery (p = 0.001), GWG (p = 0.002) and BMI at delivery (p < 0.001), while significant predictors of excessive GWG in perinatal period are: prepregnancy BMI (p = 0.029) and BMI at delivery (p < 0.001). In the group of participants with both increased prepregnancy BMI and excessive GWG versus others, significant predictors were: hypertension (HTA) (p = 0.019), amniotic fluid index (AFI) (p = 0.047), Pronation (AIMS) (p = 0.028) and Supination (AIMS) (p = 0.029). Conclusion: Increased prepregnancy BMI and excessive GWG are significantly associated with numerous perinatal factors that could alter the pregnancy course, pregnancy outcome and early motoric development of newborn. Moreover, increased prepregnancy BMI is shown to be a significant predictor of excessive GWG; thus, early selection of pregnant women for close monitoring of weight gain during pregnancy will have positive effects on reducing the risk of less favorable pregnancy course and early motoric development of newborn. View Full-Text
Keywords: obesity; weight gain; pregnancy; perinatal outcome; early motor development obesity; weight gain; pregnancy; perinatal outcome; early motor development
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Lackovic, M.; Filimonovic, D.; Mihajlovic, S.; Milicic, B.; Filipovic, I.; Rovcanin, M.; Dimitrijevic, D.; Nikolic, D. The Influence of Increased Prepregnancy Body Mass Index and Excessive Gestational Weight Gain on Pregnancy Course and Fetal and Maternal Perinatal Outcomes. Healthcare 2020, 8, 362.

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