Next Article in Journal
The Financial Implications of a Well-Hidden and Ignored Chronic Lyme Disease Pandemic
Previous Article in Journal
A Quick Surgical Treatment of Conjunctivochalasis Using Radiofrequencies
Open AccessArticle

A Randomized Controlled Trial to Investigate the Effectiveness of the Prevention of Aspiration Pneumonia Using Recommendations for Swallowing Care Guided by Ultrasound Examination

1
Department of Gerontological Nursing/Wound Care Management, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan
2
Global Nursing Research Center, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan
3
Department of Imaging Nursing Science, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan
4
Gerodontology and Oral Rehabilitation, Department of Gerontology and Gerodontology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8549, Japan
5
Department of Life Support Technology (Molten), Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Healthcare 2018, 6(1), 15; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare6010015
Received: 25 December 2017 / Revised: 29 January 2018 / Accepted: 8 February 2018 / Published: 12 February 2018
  |  
PDF [712 KB, uploaded 12 February 2018]
  |  

Abstract

Prevention for aspiration pneumonia requires assessment of aspiration and adequate swallowing care. This randomized controlled trial aimed to investigate the effectiveness of ultrasound examination and recommendations for swallowing care for the reduction of aspiration and pharyngeal post-swallow residue as compared with standard swallowing care. Twenty-three participants were randomized to the intervention group and 23 to the control group. The intervention consisted of four ultrasound examinations during mealtimes and recommendations for swallowing care every 2 weeks during an 8 week period. No recommendations concerning swallowing care based on ultrasound examinations were provided to the control group. The frequency of aspiration or residue was defined as x/y × 100% when aspiration or residue were detected x times from y times concerning the total ultrasound measurements. The proportion of the residents with reduced frequency of aspiration which was detected by ultrasonography at eight weeks were 4.3% in the intervention group and 0% in the control group. The median reduction in the frequency of aspiration and residue in the intervention group was 31%, and that in the control group was 11%. In conclusion, swallowing care guided by frequent ultrasound examinations during mealtimes had a trend of reducing the frequency of aspiration and residue during an 8-week period in individuals relative to standard swallowing care alone. View Full-Text
Keywords: aspiration pneumonia; deglutition disorders; swallowing care; ultrasound aspiration pneumonia; deglutition disorders; swallowing care; ultrasound
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Miura, Y.; Nakagami, G.; Yabunaka, K.; Tohara, H.; Noguchi, H.; Mori, T.; Sanada, H. A Randomized Controlled Trial to Investigate the Effectiveness of the Prevention of Aspiration Pneumonia Using Recommendations for Swallowing Care Guided by Ultrasound Examination. Healthcare 2018, 6, 15.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Healthcare EISSN 2227-9032 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top