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Proteomes, Volume 4, Issue 1 (March 2016)

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Open AccessReview
Mass Spectrometric Immunoassays in Characterization of Clinically Significant Proteoforms
Proteomes 2016, 4(1), 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/proteomes4010013 - 17 Mar 2016
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2206
Abstract
Proteins can exist as multiple proteoforms in vivo, as a result of alternative splicing and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), as well as posttranslational processing. To address their clinical significance in a context of diagnostic information, proteoforms require a more in-depth analysis. Mass spectrometric [...] Read more.
Proteins can exist as multiple proteoforms in vivo, as a result of alternative splicing and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), as well as posttranslational processing. To address their clinical significance in a context of diagnostic information, proteoforms require a more in-depth analysis. Mass spectrometric immunoassays (MSIA) have been devised for studying structural diversity in human proteins. MSIA enables protein profiling in a simple and high-throughput manner, by combining the selectivity of targeted immunoassays, with the specificity of mass spectrometric detection. MSIA has been used for qualitative and quantitative analysis of single and multiple proteoforms, distinguishing between normal fluctuations and changes related to clinical conditions. This mini review offers an overview of the development and application of mass spectrometric immunoassays for clinical and population proteomics studies. Provided are examples of some recent developments, and also discussed are the trends and challenges in mass spectrometry-based immunoassays for the next-phase of clinical applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Proteomics)
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Open AccessArticle
On the Rate of Synthesis of Individual Proteins within and between Different Striated Muscles of the Rat
Proteomes 2016, 4(1), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/proteomes4010012 - 15 Mar 2016
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1897
Abstract
The turnover of muscle protein is responsive to different (patho)-physiological conditions but little is known about the rate of synthesis at the level of individual proteins or whether this varies between different muscles. We investigated the synthesis rate of eight proteins (actin, albumin, [...] Read more.
The turnover of muscle protein is responsive to different (patho)-physiological conditions but little is known about the rate of synthesis at the level of individual proteins or whether this varies between different muscles. We investigated the synthesis rate of eight proteins (actin, albumin, ATP synthase alpha, beta enolase, creatine kinase, myosin essential light chain, myosin regulatory light chain and tropomyosin) in the extensor digitorum longus, diaphragm, heart and soleus of male Wistar rats (352 ± 30 g body weight). Animals were assigned to four groups (n = 3, in each), including a control and groups that received deuterium oxide (2H2O) for 4 days, 7 days or 14 days. Deuterium labelling was initiated by an intraperitoneal injection of 10 μL/g body weight of 99.9% 2H2O-saline, and was maintained by administration of 5% (v/v) 2H2O in drinking water provided ad libitum. Homogenates of the isolated muscles were analysed by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation time of flight mass spectrometry. Proteins were identified against the SwissProt database using peptide mass fingerprinting. For each of the eight proteins investigated, the molar percent enrichment (MPE) of 2H and rate constant (k) of protein synthesis was calculated from the mass isotopomer distribution of peptides based on the amino acid sequence and predicted number of exchangeable C–H bonds. The average MPE (2.14% ± 0.2%) was as expected and was consistent across muscles harvested at different times (i.e., steady state enrichment was achieved). The synthesis rate of individual proteins differed markedly within each muscle and the rank-order of synthesis rates differed among the muscles studied. After 14 days the fraction of albumin synthesised (23% ± 5%) was significantly (p < 0.05) greater than for other muscle proteins. These data represent the first attempt to study the synthesis rates of individual proteins across a number of different striated muscles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Striated Muscle Proteomics)
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Open AccessReview
Omics Approaches for the Study of Adaptive Immunity to Staphylococcus aureus and the Selection of Vaccine Candidates
Proteomes 2016, 4(1), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/proteomes4010011 - 07 Mar 2016
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2840
Abstract
Staphylococcus aureus is a dangerous pathogen both in hospitals and in the community. Due to the crisis of antibiotic resistance, there is an urgent need for new strategies to combat S. aureus infections, such as vaccination. Increasing our knowledge about the mechanisms of [...] Read more.
Staphylococcus aureus is a dangerous pathogen both in hospitals and in the community. Due to the crisis of antibiotic resistance, there is an urgent need for new strategies to combat S. aureus infections, such as vaccination. Increasing our knowledge about the mechanisms of protection will be key for the successful prevention or treatment of S. aureus invasion. Omics technologies generate a comprehensive picture of the physiological and pathophysiological processes within cells, tissues, organs, organisms and even populations. This review provides an overview of the contribution of genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics and immunoproteomics to the current understanding of S. aureus‑host interaction, with a focus on the adaptive immune response to the microorganism. While antibody responses during colonization and infection have been analyzed in detail using immunoproteomics, the full potential of omics technologies has not been tapped yet in terms of T-cells. Omics technologies promise to speed up vaccine development by enabling reverse vaccinology approaches. In consequence, omics technologies are powerful tools for deepening our understanding of the “superbug” S. aureus and for improving its control. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbial Proteomics)
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Open AccessArticle
Comparing Simplification Strategies for the Skeletal Muscle Proteome
Proteomes 2016, 4(1), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/proteomes4010010 - 02 Mar 2016
Viewed by 1759
Abstract
Skeletal muscle is a complex tissue that is dominated by the presence of a few abundant proteins. This wide dynamic range can mask the presence of lower abundance proteins, which can be a confounding factor in large-scale proteomic experiments. In this study, we [...] Read more.
Skeletal muscle is a complex tissue that is dominated by the presence of a few abundant proteins. This wide dynamic range can mask the presence of lower abundance proteins, which can be a confounding factor in large-scale proteomic experiments. In this study, we have investigated a number of pre-fractionation methods, at both the protein and peptide level, for the characterization of the skeletal muscle proteome. The analyses revealed that the use of OFFGEL isoelectric focusing yielded the largest number of protein identifications (>750) compared to alternative gel-based and protein equalization strategies. Further, OFFGEL led to a substantial enrichment of a different sub-population of the proteome. Filter-aided sample preparation (FASP), coupled to peptide-level OFFGEL provided more confidence in the results due to a substantial increase in the number of peptides assigned to each protein. The findings presented here support the use of a multiplexed approach to proteome characterization of skeletal muscle, which has a recognized imbalance in the dynamic range of its protein complement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Striated Muscle Proteomics)
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Open AccessArticle
Identification of Biomarkers for Resistance to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense Infection and in Silico Studies in Musa paradisiaca Cultivar Puttabale through Proteomic Approach
Proteomes 2016, 4(1), 9; https://doi.org/10.3390/proteomes4010009 - 24 Feb 2016
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2088
Abstract
Panama wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc) is one of the major disease constraints of banana production. Previously, we reported the disease resistance Musa paradisiaca cv. puttabale clones developed from Ethylmethanesulfonate and Foc culture filtrate against Foc inoculation. Here, the [...] Read more.
Panama wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc) is one of the major disease constraints of banana production. Previously, we reported the disease resistance Musa paradisiaca cv. puttabale clones developed from Ethylmethanesulfonate and Foc culture filtrate against Foc inoculation. Here, the same resistant clones and susceptible clones were used for the study of protein accumulation against Foc inoculation by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), their expression pattern and an in silico approach. The present investigation revealed mass-spectrometry identified 16 proteins that were over accumulated and 5 proteins that were under accumulated as compared to the control. The polyphosphoinositide binding protein ssh2p (PBPssh2p) and Indoleacetic acid-induced-like (IAA) protein showed significant up-regulation and down-regulation. The docking of the pathogenesis-related protein (PR) with the fungal protein endopolygalacturonase (PG) exemplify the three ionic interactions and seven hydrophobic residues that tends to good interaction at the active site of PG with free energy of assembly dissociation (1.5 kcal/mol). The protein-ligand docking of the Peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase chloroplastic-like protein (PMSRc) with the ligand β-1,3 glucan showed minimum binding energy (−6.48 kcal/mol) and docking energy (−8.2 kcal/mol) with an interaction of nine amino-acid residues. These explorations accelerate the research in designing the host pathogen interaction studies for the better management of diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Plant Proteomics: Methodology to Biology)
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Open AccessArticle
A Staphylococcus aureus Proteome Overview: Shared and Specific Proteins and Protein Complexes from Representative Strains of All Three Clades
Proteomes 2016, 4(1), 8; https://doi.org/10.3390/proteomes4010008 - 19 Feb 2016
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2291
Abstract
Staphylococcus aureus is an important model organism and pathogen. This S. aureus proteome overview details shared and specific proteins and selected virulence-relevant protein complexes from representative strains of all three major clades. To determine the strain distribution and major clades we used a [...] Read more.
Staphylococcus aureus is an important model organism and pathogen. This S. aureus proteome overview details shared and specific proteins and selected virulence-relevant protein complexes from representative strains of all three major clades. To determine the strain distribution and major clades we used a refined strain comparison combining ribosomal RNA, MLST markers, and looking at highly-conserved regions shared between strains. This analysis shows three sub-clades (A–C) for S. aureus. As calculations are complex and strain annotation is quite time consuming we compare here key representatives of each clade with each other: model strains COL, USA300, Newman, and HG001 (clade A), model strain N315 and Mu50 (clade B) and ED133 and MRSA252 (clade C). We look at these individual proteomes and compare them to a background of 64 S. aureus strains. There are overall 13,284 S. aureus proteins not part of the core proteome which are involved in different strain-specific or more general complexes requiring detailed annotation and new experimental data to be accurately delineated. By comparison of the eight representative strains, we identify strain-specific proteins (e.g., 18 in COL, 105 in N315 and 44 in Newman) that characterize each strain and analyze pathogenicity islands if they contain such strain-specific proteins. We identify strain-specific protein repertoires involved in virulence, in cell wall metabolism, and phosphorylation. Finally we compare and analyze protein complexes conserved and well-characterized among S. aureus (a total of 103 complexes), as well as predict and analyze several individual protein complexes, including structure modeling in the three clades. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbial Proteomics)
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Open AccessArticle
Proteomics of Skeletal Muscle: Focus on Insulin Resistance and Exercise Biology
Proteomes 2016, 4(1), 6; https://doi.org/10.3390/proteomes4010006 - 04 Feb 2016
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2871
Abstract
Skeletal muscle is the largest tissue in the human body and plays an important role in locomotion and whole body metabolism. It accounts for ~80% of insulin stimulated glucose disposal. Skeletal muscle insulin resistance, a primary feature of Type 2 diabetes, is caused [...] Read more.
Skeletal muscle is the largest tissue in the human body and plays an important role in locomotion and whole body metabolism. It accounts for ~80% of insulin stimulated glucose disposal. Skeletal muscle insulin resistance, a primary feature of Type 2 diabetes, is caused by a decreased ability of muscle to respond to circulating insulin. Physical exercise improves insulin sensitivity and whole body metabolism and remains one of the most promising interventions for the prevention of Type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance and exercise adaptations in skeletal muscle might be a cause, or consequence, of altered protein expressions profiles and/or their posttranslational modifications (PTMs). Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics offer enormous promise for investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle insulin resistance and exercise-induced adaptation; however, skeletal muscle proteomics are challenging. This review describes the technical limitations of skeletal muscle proteomics as well as emerging developments in proteomics workflow with respect to samples preparation, liquid chromatography (LC), MS and computational analysis. These technologies have not yet been fully exploited in the field of skeletal muscle proteomics. Future studies that involve state-of-the-art proteomics technology will broaden our understanding of exercise-induced adaptations as well as molecular pathogenesis of insulin resistance. This could lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Striated Muscle Proteomics)
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Open AccessArticle
Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Cotton Fiber Development and Protein Extraction Method Comparison in Late Stage Fibers
Proteomes 2016, 4(1), 7; https://doi.org/10.3390/proteomes4010007 - 03 Feb 2016
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2745
Abstract
The distinct stages of cotton fiber development and maturation serve as a single-celled model for studying the molecular mechanisms of plant cell elongation, cell wall development and cellulose biosynthesis. However, this model system of plant cell development is compromised for proteomic studies due [...] Read more.
The distinct stages of cotton fiber development and maturation serve as a single-celled model for studying the molecular mechanisms of plant cell elongation, cell wall development and cellulose biosynthesis. However, this model system of plant cell development is compromised for proteomic studies due to a lack of an efficient protein extraction method during the later stages of fiber development, because of a recalcitrant cell wall and the presence of abundant phenolic compounds. Here, we compared the quality and quantities of proteins extracted from 25 dpa (days post anthesis) fiber with multiple protein extraction methods and present a comprehensive quantitative proteomic study of fiber development from 10 dpa to 25 dpa. Comparative analysis using a label-free quantification method revealed 287 differentially-expressed proteins in the 10 dpa to 25 dpa fiber developmental period. Proteins involved in cell wall metabolism and regulation, cytoskeleton development and carbohydrate metabolism among other functional categories in four fiber developmental stages were identified. Our studies provide protocols for protein extraction from maturing fiber tissues for mass spectrometry analysis and expand knowledge of the proteomic profile of cotton fiber development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Plant Proteomics: Methodology to Biology)
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Open AccessReview
The Pollen Coat Proteome: At the Cutting Edge of Plant Reproduction
Proteomes 2016, 4(1), 5; https://doi.org/10.3390/proteomes4010005 - 29 Jan 2016
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1971
Abstract
The tapetum is a single layer of secretory cells which encloses the anther locule and sustains pollen development and maturation. Upon apoptosis, the remnants of the tapetal cells, consisting mostly of lipids and proteins, fill the pits of the sculpted exine to form [...] Read more.
The tapetum is a single layer of secretory cells which encloses the anther locule and sustains pollen development and maturation. Upon apoptosis, the remnants of the tapetal cells, consisting mostly of lipids and proteins, fill the pits of the sculpted exine to form the bulk of the pollen coat. This extracellular matrix forms an impermeable barrier that protects the male gametophyte from water loss and UV light. It also aids pollen adhesion and hydration and retains small signaling compounds involved in pollen–stigma communication. In this study, we have updated the list of the pollen coat’s protein components and also discussed their functions in the context of sexual reproduction Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Plant Proteomics: Methodology to Biology)
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Open AccessEditorial
Acknowledgement to Reviewers of Proteomes in 2015
Proteomes 2016, 4(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/proteomes4010004 - 26 Jan 2016
Viewed by 1050
Abstract
The editors of Proteomes would like to express their sincere gratitude to the following reviewers for assessing manuscripts in 2015. [...] Full article
Open AccessReview
A Review of Functional Motifs Utilized by Viruses
Proteomes 2016, 4(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/proteomes4010003 - 21 Jan 2016
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 2310
Abstract
Short linear motifs (SLiM) are short peptides that facilitate protein function and protein-protein interactions. Viruses utilize these motifs to enter into the host, interact with cellular proteins, or egress from host cells. Studying functional motifs may help to predict protein characteristics, interactions, or [...] Read more.
Short linear motifs (SLiM) are short peptides that facilitate protein function and protein-protein interactions. Viruses utilize these motifs to enter into the host, interact with cellular proteins, or egress from host cells. Studying functional motifs may help to predict protein characteristics, interactions, or the putative cellular role of a protein. In virology, it may reveal aspects of the virus tropism and help find antiviral therapeutics. This review highlights the recent understanding of functional motifs utilized by viruses. Special attention was paid to the function of proteins harboring these motifs, and viruses encoding these proteins. The review highlights motifs involved in (i) immune response and post-translational modifications (e.g., ubiquitylation, SUMOylation or ISGylation); (ii) virus-host cell interactions, including virus attachment, entry, fusion, egress and nuclear trafficking; (iii) virulence and antiviral activities; (iv) virion structure; and (v) low-complexity regions (LCRs) or motifs enriched with residues (Xaa-rich motifs). Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Response to Zinc, Magnesium, and Calcium Deficiency in Specific Cell Types of Arabidopsis Roots
Proteomes 2016, 4(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/proteomes4010001 - 12 Jan 2016
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1890
Abstract
The proteome profiles of specific cell types have recently been investigated using techniques such as fluorescence activated cell sorting and laser capture microdissection. However, quantitative proteomic analysis of specific cell types has not yet been performed. In this study, to investigate the response [...] Read more.
The proteome profiles of specific cell types have recently been investigated using techniques such as fluorescence activated cell sorting and laser capture microdissection. However, quantitative proteomic analysis of specific cell types has not yet been performed. In this study, to investigate the response of the proteome to zinc, magnesium, and calcium deficiency in specific cell types of Arabidopsis thaliana roots, we performed isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomics using GFP-expressing protoplasts collected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Protoplasts were collected from the pGL2-GFPer and pMGP-GFPer marker lines for epidermis or inner cell lines (pericycle, endodermis, and cortex), respectively. To increase the number of proteins identified, iTRAQ-labeled peptides were separated into 24 fractions by OFFGFEL electrophoresis prior to high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry analysis. Overall, 1039 and 737 proteins were identified and quantified in the epidermal and inner cell lines, respectively. Interestingly, the expression of many proteins was decreased in the epidermis by mineral deficiency, although a weaker effect was observed in inner cell lines such as the pericycle, endodermis, and cortex. Here, we report for the first time the quantitative proteomics of specific cell types in Arabidopsis roots. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Plant Proteomics: Methodology to Biology)
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Open AccessCommentary
Will Quantitative Proteomics Redefine Some of the Key Concepts in Skeletal Muscle Physiology?
Proteomes 2016, 4(1), 2; https://doi.org/10.3390/proteomes4010002 - 11 Jan 2016
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1576
Abstract
Molecular and cellular biology methodology is traditionally based on the reasoning called “the mechanistic explanation”. In practice, this means identifying and selecting correlations between biological processes which result from our manipulation of a biological system. In theory, a successful application of this approach [...] Read more.
Molecular and cellular biology methodology is traditionally based on the reasoning called “the mechanistic explanation”. In practice, this means identifying and selecting correlations between biological processes which result from our manipulation of a biological system. In theory, a successful application of this approach requires precise knowledge about all parameters of a studied system. However, in practice, due to the systems’ complexity, this requirement is rarely, if ever, accomplished. Typically, it is limited to a quantitative or semi-quantitative measurements of selected parameters (e.g., concentrations of some metabolites), and a qualitative or semi-quantitative description of expression/post-translational modifications changes within selected proteins. A quantitative proteomics approach gives a possibility of quantitative characterization of the entire proteome of a biological system, in the context of the titer of proteins as well as their post-translational modifications. This enables not only more accurate testing of novel hypotheses but also provides tools that can be used to verify some of the most fundamental dogmas of modern biology. In this short review, we discuss some of the consequences of using quantitative proteomics to verify several key concepts in skeletal muscle physiology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Striated Muscle Proteomics)
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