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Article

What Lies Beneath: The Role of Self-Efficacy, Causal Attribution Habits, and Gender in Accounting for the Success of College Students

1
School of Politics, Security, and International Affairs, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816, USA
2
College of Sciences and Human Studies, Prince Mohammad Bin Fahd University, Al Khobar 31952, Saudi Arabia
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: James Albright
Educ. Sci. 2021, 11(7), 333; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci11070333
Received: 4 June 2021 / Revised: 29 June 2021 / Accepted: 30 June 2021 / Published: 5 July 2021
Existing research has identified gender as a driving variable of student success in higher education: women attend college at a higher rate and are also more successful than their male peers. We build on the extant literature by asking whether specific cognitive variables (i.e., self-efficacy and causal attribution habits) distinguish male and female students with differing academic performance levels. Using a case study, we collected data from students enrolled in a general education course (sample size N = 400) at a large public university in the United States. Our findings indicate that while students’ course grades and cumulative college grades did not vary by gender, female and male students reported different self-efficacy and causal attribution habits for good grades and poor grades. To illustrate, self-efficacy for female students is broad and stretches across all their courses; in contrast, for male students, it is more limited to specific courses. These gender differences in cognition, particularly in accounting for undesirable events, may assist faculty members and advisors in understanding how students respond to difficulties and challenges. View Full-Text
Keywords: self-efficacy; causal attribution; gender gap; student success self-efficacy; causal attribution; gender gap; student success
MDPI and ACS Style

Hamann, K.; Pilotti, M.A.E.; Wilson, B.M. What Lies Beneath: The Role of Self-Efficacy, Causal Attribution Habits, and Gender in Accounting for the Success of College Students. Educ. Sci. 2021, 11, 333. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci11070333

AMA Style

Hamann K, Pilotti MAE, Wilson BM. What Lies Beneath: The Role of Self-Efficacy, Causal Attribution Habits, and Gender in Accounting for the Success of College Students. Education Sciences. 2021; 11(7):333. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci11070333

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hamann, Kerstin, Maura A.E. Pilotti, and Bruce M. Wilson 2021. "What Lies Beneath: The Role of Self-Efficacy, Causal Attribution Habits, and Gender in Accounting for the Success of College Students" Education Sciences 11, no. 7: 333. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci11070333

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