Next Article in Journal
Synthesis and Experimental Characterization of a MWCNT-Filled Bio-Based Adhesive
Next Article in Special Issue
Validation of a Simulation Tool for an Environmentally Friendly Aircraft Cargo Fire Protection System
Previous Article in Journal
Non-Propellant Eddy Current Brake and Traction in Space Using Magnetic Pulses
Previous Article in Special Issue
Proof of Concept Study for Fuselage Boundary Layer Ingesting Propulsion
Article

Performance and Emissions of a Microturbine and Turbofan Powered by Alternative Fuels †

1
Instytut Techniczny Wojsk Lotniczych (ITWL), ul. Ksiecia Boleslawa 6, 01-494 Warsaw, Poland
2
Faculty of Civil and Transport Engineering, Poznan University of Technology, ul. Piotrowo 3, 60-965 Poznan, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
This paper is an extended version of our paper published in 10th EASN International Conference on Innovation in Aviation & Space to the Satisfaction of the European Citizens.
Academic Editor: Spiros Pantelakis
Aerospace 2021, 8(2), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace8020025
Received: 15 December 2020 / Revised: 14 January 2021 / Accepted: 15 January 2021 / Published: 21 January 2021
Alternative fuels containing biocomponents produced in various technologies are introduced in aviation to reduce its carbon footprint but there is little data describing their impact on the performance and emissions of engines. The purpose of the work is to compare the performance and gas emissions produced from two different jet engines—the GTM-140 microturbine and the full-size DGEN380 turbofan, powered by blends of Jet A-1 and one of two biocomponents: (1) Alcohol-to-Jet (ATJ) and (2) Hydroprocessed Esters and Fatty Acids (HEFA) produced from used cooking oil (UCO) in various concentrations. The acquired data will be used to develop an engine emissivity model to predict gas emissions. Blends of the mineral fuel with synthetic components were prepared in various concentrations, and their physicochemical parameters were examined in the laboratory. Measurements of emissions from both engines were carried out in selected operating points using the Semtech DS gaseous analyzer and the EEPS spectrometer. The impact of tested blends on engine operating parameters is limited, and their use does not carry the risk of a significant decrease in aircraft performance or increase in fuel consumption. Increasing the content of biocomponents causes a noticeable rise in the emission of CO and slight increase for some other gasses (HC and NOx), which should not, however, worsen the working conditions of the ground personnel. This implies that there are no contraindications against using tested blends for fuelling gas-turbine engines. View Full-Text
Keywords: turbofan; microturbine; sustainable aviation fuel; ATJ; HEFA; emissions; alternative fuel; biocomponent; combustion; fuel blend; drop-in fuel; synthesized kerosene turbofan; microturbine; sustainable aviation fuel; ATJ; HEFA; emissions; alternative fuel; biocomponent; combustion; fuel blend; drop-in fuel; synthesized kerosene
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Przysowa, R.; Gawron, B.; Białecki, T.; Łęgowik, A.; Merkisz, J.; Jasiński, R. Performance and Emissions of a Microturbine and Turbofan Powered by Alternative Fuels. Aerospace 2021, 8, 25. https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace8020025

AMA Style

Przysowa R, Gawron B, Białecki T, Łęgowik A, Merkisz J, Jasiński R. Performance and Emissions of a Microturbine and Turbofan Powered by Alternative Fuels. Aerospace. 2021; 8(2):25. https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace8020025

Chicago/Turabian Style

Przysowa, Radoslaw, Bartosz Gawron, Tomasz Białecki, Anna Łęgowik, Jerzy Merkisz, and Remigiusz Jasiński. 2021. "Performance and Emissions of a Microturbine and Turbofan Powered by Alternative Fuels" Aerospace 8, no. 2: 25. https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace8020025

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop