Next Article in Journal
Study of the Lower Stratospheric Temperature over the Arabian Peninsula
Previous Article in Journal
Establishing Relationships between Drought Indices and Wildfire Danger Outputs: A Test Case for the California-Nevada Drought Early Warning System
Previous Article in Special Issue
Dust Devils: Structural Features, Dynamics and Climate Impact
Article Menu
Issue 4 (April) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle

A Case Study of Ozone Diurnal Variation in the Convective Boundary Layer in the Southeastern United States Using Multiple Observations and Large-Eddy Simulation

1
Environmental and Health Sciences Program, Spelman College, Atlanta, GA 30314, USA
2
Atmospheric Science Department, The University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35805, USA
3
Earth System Science Center, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35805, USA
4
Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, D55122 Mainz, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Climate 2019, 7(4), 53; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli7040053
Received: 7 March 2019 / Revised: 2 April 2019 / Accepted: 2 April 2019 / Published: 8 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact of Atmospheric Chemistry on Local Weather and Local Climate)
  |  
PDF [3916 KB, uploaded 9 April 2019]
  |  

Abstract

We investigated the diurnal ozone variation on 6 September 2013 in a midsize urban environment using multiple in situ and remote-sensing measurements along with the Dutch atmospheric large-eddy simulation (DALES) model coupled with a chemical module and a dry deposition module that we added for this study. Our study area was Huntsville, Alabama, USA, a typical midsize city in the Southeastern United States. The ozone variation in the convective boundary layer (CBL) resulted mainly from local emissions and photochemical production stemming from weather conditions controlled by an anticyclonic system on that day. Local chemical production contributes approximately two thirds of the ozone enhancement in the CBL and, in this case, dynamical processes including ozone transport from the free troposphere (FT) to the CBL through the entrainment processes contributed the remainder. The numerical experiments performed by the large-eddy simulation (LES) model showed acceptable agreement with the TOLNet (The tropospheric ozone lidar network)/RO3QET (Rocket-city ozone quality evaluation in the troposphere) ozone DIAL (differential absorption lidar) observations. This study indicated the need for fine-scale, three-dimensional ozone observations with high temporal and spatial resolution for air quality studies at the urban scale and smaller. View Full-Text
Keywords: convective boundary layer; ozone; lidar; large-eddy simulation convective boundary layer; ozone; lidar; large-eddy simulation
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Huang, G.; Newchurch, M.; Kuang, S.; Ouwersloot, H.G. A Case Study of Ozone Diurnal Variation in the Convective Boundary Layer in the Southeastern United States Using Multiple Observations and Large-Eddy Simulation. Climate 2019, 7, 53.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Climate EISSN 2225-1154 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top