Next Article in Journal
Antibody-Based Targeting of Cell Surface GRP94 Specifically Inhibits Cetuximab-Resistant Colorectal Cancer Growth
Previous Article in Journal
Endothelial-Cell-Derived Human Secretory Leukocyte Protease Inhibitor (SLPI) Protects Cardiomyocytes against Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury
Open AccessFeature PaperReview

Translation from the Ribosome to the Clinic: Implication in Neurological Disorders and New Perspectives from Recent Advances

Laboratory for Protein Conformation Diseases, RIKEN Center for Brain Science, Wako, Saitama 351-0198, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally.
Biomolecules 2019, 9(11), 680; https://doi.org/10.3390/biom9110680
Received: 4 September 2019 / Revised: 27 October 2019 / Accepted: 29 October 2019 / Published: 1 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue RNA Trafficking and Local Translation in Neuronal Health and Disease)
De novo protein synthesis by the ribosome and its multitude of co-factors must occur in a tightly regulated manner to ensure that the correct proteins are produced accurately at the right time and, in some cases, also in the proper location. With novel techniques such as ribosome profiling and cryogenic electron microscopy, our understanding of this basic biological process is better than ever and continues to grow. Concurrently, increasing attention is focused on how translational regulation in the brain may be disrupted during the progression of various neurological disorders. In fact, translational dysregulation is now recognized as the de facto pathogenic cause for some disorders. Novel mechanisms including ribosome stalling, ribosome-associated quality control, and liquid-liquid phase separation are closely linked to translational regulation, and may thus be involved in the pathogenic process. The relationships between translational dysregulation and neurological disorders, as well as the ways through which we may be able to reverse those detrimental effects, will be examined in this review.
Keywords: neurological disorders; phase separation; mRNA translational regulation; ribosome-associated quality control; ribosome stalling; tRNA dynamics neurological disorders; phase separation; mRNA translational regulation; ribosome-associated quality control; ribosome stalling; tRNA dynamics
MDPI and ACS Style

Hui, K.K.; Chen, Y.-K.; Endo, R.; Tanaka, M. Translation from the Ribosome to the Clinic: Implication in Neurological Disorders and New Perspectives from Recent Advances. Biomolecules 2019, 9, 680.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop