Next Article in Journal
Benefit Analysis and Regulatory Actions for Imported Palm Kernel Shell as an Environment-Friendly Energy Source in Taiwan
Next Article in Special Issue
Mandatory Recycling of Waste Cooking Oil from Residential and Commercial Sectors in Taiwan
Previous Article in Journal
Assessment of the Vulnerability to Drought and Desertification Characteristics Using the Standardized Drought Vulnerability Index (SDVI) and the Environmentally Sensitive Areas Index (ESAI)
Previous Article in Special Issue
Value Chain Actors and Recycled Polymer Products in Lagos Metropolis: Toward Ensuring Sustainable Development in Africa’s Megacity
Article Menu
Issue 1 (March) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Resources 2019, 8(1), 7; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources8010007

Renewable Energy as an Underutilised Resource in Cities: Germany’s ‘Energiewende’ and Lessons for Post-Brexit Cities in the United Kingdom

1
Department of Geography and Environment, London School of Economics, London WC2A 2AE, UK
2
Chair of Land Management, Technical University of Munich, Arcisstrasse 21, 80333 München, Germany
3
Bartlett School of Planning, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 4 December 2018 / Revised: 22 December 2018 / Accepted: 25 December 2018 / Published: 31 December 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Underutilised Resources in Urban Environments)
Full-Text   |   PDF [1138 KB, uploaded 31 December 2018]   |  

Abstract

Renewable energy remains an underutilised resource within urban environments. This study examines the ongoing German Energiewende (energy transition) as an example of renewable energy being treated as a necessary resource for urban development. It departs from existing literature by operationalising the Advocacy Coalition Framework (ACF), taking a policy systems approach to analyse (and explain) the cases of three German cities—Munich, Berlin, and Freiburg. This approach helps draw lessons for future UK energy scenarios by placing more abstract conceptions of Sustainable Energy Transitions (SETs) within the context of UK cities, post-Brexit. By discussing five main themes: the shift from government to governance; the need to break ‘carbon lock-in’; renewable energy innovation as an underutilised resource; developing governance strategies for renewable energy resources; the shift from policy to practice, the study yields a detailed reconceptualisation of approaches to renewable energy resource-use policy. The novelty of this study lies in its response to these challenges, taking a policy systems approach to energy governance. The article concludes with a proposed integrated framework. The framework, which is based on multi-scalar and multi-stakeholder integrated energy governance strategy, reconsiders the way in which renewable energy resources are seen in current governance terms in the UK. The framework presents a new approach to renewable energy resource-use policy that embraces innovation, responsible governance, and inclusive processes, (alongside thinking beyond simply technical solutions) to considering the socio-economic impacts of policy decisions in cities. View Full-Text
Keywords: city planning; Energiewende; post-Brexit; renewable energy systems; resource-use policy; sustainable energy transitions; underutilised resources city planning; Energiewende; post-Brexit; renewable energy systems; resource-use policy; sustainable energy transitions; underutilised resources
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Sait, M.A.; Chigbu, U.E.; Hamiduddin, I.; De Vries, W.T. Renewable Energy as an Underutilised Resource in Cities: Germany’s ‘Energiewende’ and Lessons for Post-Brexit Cities in the United Kingdom. Resources 2019, 8, 7.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Resources EISSN 2079-9276 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top