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Warning System Options for Landslide Risk: A Case Study in Upper Austria
Article

A Participatory Process to Develop a Landslide Warning System: Paradoxes of Responsibility Sharing in a Case Study in Upper Austria

1
Risk and Resilience Program, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), 2361 Laxenburg, Austria
2
Climate Policy Group, Department of Environmental Systems Science, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich), 8092 Zurich, Switzerland
3
Department of Geophysics, Geological Survey of Austria (GSA), 1030 Vienna, Austria
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Resources 2017, 6(4), 54; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources6040054
Received: 18 August 2017 / Revised: 18 September 2017 / Accepted: 28 September 2017 / Published: 3 October 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Difficult Decisions in Disaster Risk and Environmental Management)
During a participatory process in Gmunden, Austria, the organizational and responsibility-sharing arrangements for a landslide warning system proved to be contested issues. While questions on the warning system technology and the distribution of information, including the alarm for evacuation, could be resolved with the support of experts, controversies arose on the financial and legal responsibilities that ensure long-term and effective monitoring for the protection of the landslide-prone community. This paper examines how responsibilities can be shared among the residents, experts, and public authorities during the design and operation of landslide warning systems. In particular, we discuss the outcome and implications of three stakeholder workshops where participants deliberated on warning-system options that, in turn, were based on a discourse analysis of extensive stakeholder interviews. The results of the case study show that an end-user orientation requires the consideration of stakeholder worldviews, interests, and conflicts. Paradoxically, the public did not fully support their own involvement in the maintenance and control of the warning system, but the authorities promoted shared responsibility. Deliberative planning does not then necessarily lead to responsibility sharing, but it proved effective as a platform for information and for shared ownership in the warning system. View Full-Text
Keywords: warning system; landslide risk; technical-policy option; responsibility sharing; public participation; stakeholder perspectives; warning communication and decision making warning system; landslide risk; technical-policy option; responsibility sharing; public participation; stakeholder perspectives; warning communication and decision making
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MDPI and ACS Style

Preuner, P.; Scolobig, A.; Linnerooth Bayer, J.; Ottowitz, D.; Hoyer, S.; Jochum, B. A Participatory Process to Develop a Landslide Warning System: Paradoxes of Responsibility Sharing in a Case Study in Upper Austria. Resources 2017, 6, 54. https://doi.org/10.3390/resources6040054

AMA Style

Preuner P, Scolobig A, Linnerooth Bayer J, Ottowitz D, Hoyer S, Jochum B. A Participatory Process to Develop a Landslide Warning System: Paradoxes of Responsibility Sharing in a Case Study in Upper Austria. Resources. 2017; 6(4):54. https://doi.org/10.3390/resources6040054

Chicago/Turabian Style

Preuner, Philipp, Anna Scolobig, JoAnne Linnerooth Bayer, David Ottowitz, Stefan Hoyer, and Birgit Jochum. 2017. "A Participatory Process to Develop a Landslide Warning System: Paradoxes of Responsibility Sharing in a Case Study in Upper Austria" Resources 6, no. 4: 54. https://doi.org/10.3390/resources6040054

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