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Article

Rapid Antibacterial Activity of Cannabichromenic Acid against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

1
Discipline of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, School of Medical Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
2
Charles Perkins Centre and Marie Bashir Institute for Infectious Diseases and Biosecurity, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
3
School of Chemistry, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
4
The Ithree Institute, University of Technology Sydney, Ultimo, NSW 2007, Australia
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Antibiotics 2020, 9(8), 523; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9080523
Received: 22 July 2020 / Revised: 14 August 2020 / Accepted: 15 August 2020 / Published: 16 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococci)
Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has proven to be an imminent threat to public health, intensifying the need for novel therapeutics. Previous evidence suggests that cannabinoids harbour potent antibacterial activity. In this study, a group of previously inaccessible phytocannabinoids and synthetic analogues were examined for potential antibacterial activity. The minimum inhibitory concentrations and dynamics of bacterial inhibition, determined through resazurin reduction and time-kill assays, revealed the potent antibacterial activity of the phytocannabinoids against gram-positive antibiotic-resistant bacterial species, including MRSA. One phytocannabinoid, cannabichromenic acid (CBCA), demonstrated faster and more potent bactericidal activity than vancomycin, the currently recommended antibiotic for the treatment of MRSA infections. Such bactericidal activity was sustained against low-and high-dose inoculums as well as exponential- and stationary-phase MRSA cells. Further, mammalian cell viability was maintained in the presence of CBCA. Finally, microscopic evaluation suggests that CBCA may function through the degradation of the bacterial lipid membrane and alteration of the bacterial nucleoid. The results of the current study provide encouraging evidence that cannabinoids may serve as a previously unrecognised resource for the generation of novel antibiotics active against MRSA. View Full-Text
Keywords: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus; antibiotics; phytocannabinoids; cannabichromenic acid; time-kill assay methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus; antibiotics; phytocannabinoids; cannabichromenic acid; time-kill assay
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MDPI and ACS Style

Galletta, M.; Reekie, T.A.; Nagalingam, G.; Bottomley, A.L.; Harry, E.J.; Kassiou, M.; Triccas, J.A. Rapid Antibacterial Activity of Cannabichromenic Acid against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Antibiotics 2020, 9, 523. https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9080523

AMA Style

Galletta M, Reekie TA, Nagalingam G, Bottomley AL, Harry EJ, Kassiou M, Triccas JA. Rapid Antibacterial Activity of Cannabichromenic Acid against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Antibiotics. 2020; 9(8):523. https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9080523

Chicago/Turabian Style

Galletta, Maria, Tristan A. Reekie, Gayathri Nagalingam, Amy L. Bottomley, Elizabeth J. Harry, Michael Kassiou, and James A. Triccas 2020. "Rapid Antibacterial Activity of Cannabichromenic Acid against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus" Antibiotics 9, no. 8: 523. https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9080523

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