Next Article in Journal
GEdIL—Gamified Education Interoperability Language
Next Article in Special Issue
Comparison of Methods to Evaluate the Influence of an Automated Vehicle’s Driving Behavior on Pedestrians: Wizard of Oz, Virtual Reality, and Video
Previous Article in Journal
The Right to the City in the Platform Age: Child-Friendly City and Smart City Premises in Contention
Previous Article in Special Issue
Human–Vehicle Integration in the Code of Practice for Automated Driving
Open AccessArticle

Effects of Marking Automated Vehicles on Human Drivers on Highways

1
Chair of Ergonomics, Technical University of Munich, 85748 Garching, Germany
2
BMW Group, New Technologies, 85748 Garching, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Information 2020, 11(6), 286; https://doi.org/10.3390/info11060286
Received: 4 May 2020 / Revised: 22 May 2020 / Accepted: 25 May 2020 / Published: 28 May 2020
Due to the short range of the sensor technology used in automated vehicles, we assume that the implemented driving strategies may initially differ from those of human drivers. Nevertheless, automated vehicles must be able to move safely through manual road traffic. Initially, they will behave as carefully as human learners do. In the same way that driving-school vehicles tend to be marked in Germany, markings for automated vehicles could also prove advantageous. To this end, a simulation study with 40 participants was conducted. All participants experienced three different highway scenarios, each with and without a marked automated vehicle. One scenario was based around some roadworks, the next scenario was a traffic jam, and the last scenario involved a lane change. Common to all scenarios was that the automated vehicles strictly adhered to German highway regulations, and therefore moved in road traffic somewhat differently to human drivers. After each trial, we asked participants to rate how appropriate and disturbing the automated vehicle’s driving behavior was. We also measured objective data, such as the time of a lane change and the time headway. The results show no differences for the subjective and objective data regarding the marking of an automated vehicle. Reasons for this might be that the driving behavior itself is sufficiently informative for humans to recognize an automated vehicle. In addition, participants experienced the automated vehicle’s driving behavior for the first time, and it is reasonable to assume that an adjustment of the humans’ driving behavior would take place in the event of repeated encounters. View Full-Text
Keywords: marking automated vehicles; automated vehicles―human drivers interaction; mixed traffic; explicit communication; external human-machine interface marking automated vehicles; automated vehicles―human drivers interaction; mixed traffic; explicit communication; external human-machine interface
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Fuest, T.; Feierle, A.; Schmidt, E.; Bengler, K. Effects of Marking Automated Vehicles on Human Drivers on Highways. Information 2020, 11, 286.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop