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Open AccessArticle

Supporting Drivers of Partially Automated Cars through an Adaptive Digital In-Car Tutor

1
Transport Engineering and Management, University of Twente, Drienerlolaan 5, 7522 NB Enschede, The Netherlands
2
Department of Design, Production and Management, University of Twente, Drienerlolaan 5, 7522 NB Enschede, The Netherlands
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Department Cognitive Psychology and Ergonomics, University of Twente, Drienerlolaan 5, 7522 NB Enschede, The Netherlands
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TNO Traffic & Transport, Anna van Buerenplein 1, 2496 RZ The Hague, The Netherlands
5
Department of Industrial Design, Eindhoven University of Technology, Groene Loper 3, 5612 AE Eindhoven, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Information 2020, 11(4), 185; https://doi.org/10.3390/info11040185
Received: 28 February 2020 / Revised: 26 March 2020 / Accepted: 27 March 2020 / Published: 30 March 2020
Drivers struggle to understand how, and when, to safely use their cars’ complex automated functions. Training is necessary but costly and time consuming. A Digital In-Car Tutor (DIT) is proposed to support drivers in learning about, and trying out, their car automation during regular drives. During this driving simulator study, we investigated the effects of a DIT prototype on appropriate automation use and take-over quality. The study had three sessions, each containing multiple driving scenarios. Participants needed to use the automation when they thought that it was safe, and turn it off if it was not. The control group read an information brochure before driving, while the experiment group received the DIT during the first driving session. DIT users showed more correct automation use and a better take-over quality during the first driving session. The DIT especially reduced inappropriate reliance behaviour throughout all sessions. Users of the DIT did show some under-trust during the last driving session. Overall, the concept of a DIT shows potential as a low-cost and time-saving solution for safe guided learning in partially automated cars. View Full-Text
Keywords: Adaptive HMI; automated driving; automotive user interfaces; driver behaviour Adaptive HMI; automated driving; automotive user interfaces; driver behaviour
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MDPI and ACS Style

Boelhouwer, A.; van den Beukel, A.P.; van der Voort, M.C.; Verwey, W.B.; Martens, M.H. Supporting Drivers of Partially Automated Cars through an Adaptive Digital In-Car Tutor. Information 2020, 11, 185. https://doi.org/10.3390/info11040185

AMA Style

Boelhouwer A, van den Beukel AP, van der Voort MC, Verwey WB, Martens MH. Supporting Drivers of Partially Automated Cars through an Adaptive Digital In-Car Tutor. Information. 2020; 11(4):185. https://doi.org/10.3390/info11040185

Chicago/Turabian Style

Boelhouwer, Anika; van den Beukel, Arie P.; van der Voort, Mascha C.; Verwey, Willem B.; Martens, Marieke H. 2020. "Supporting Drivers of Partially Automated Cars through an Adaptive Digital In-Car Tutor" Information 11, no. 4: 185. https://doi.org/10.3390/info11040185

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