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Article

A Transcript of Submission: Jesus as Fated Victim of Divine Violence in the Old Saxon Heliand

1
Humanities & Christian Studies, Bryan College, Dayton, TN 37321, USA
2
School of Ministry Faculty, Richmont Graduate University, Atlanta, GA 30339, USA
Academic Editor: Marina Montesano
Religions 2021, 12(5), 306; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12050306
Received: 1 March 2021 / Revised: 11 April 2021 / Accepted: 21 April 2021 / Published: 28 April 2021
The Heliand, written shortly after the conquest and conversion of the Saxons at the hands of Charlemagne, maintains a vexed place in the study of medieval European Christianity(ies). Some argue that the Heliand’s overarching intent was pastoral, meant to ease the fears and calm the rage of the defeated Saxons, while others posit that the Heliand reflects a “dissident gospel,” aimed at subverting the official theological outlook of the Carolingian empire. This study argues that while both theories capture something of the Heliand’s ingenious contextual impact, they underestimate one of its key themes: the role of wurd (fate) and its co-identification with the “power of God,” which drives Jesus to the cross and scaffolds his submission to the violence of the divine will. Thus, the Heliand presents compliant victimization as the proper “fate” of those who submit to God’s purposes, promising a heavenly reward and countermanding the Saxon ethos of resistance. View Full-Text
Keywords: Heliand; Saxon Christianity; Germanic Christianity; medieval Christianity; political theology; theology of the cross; redemptive violence; contextualization Heliand; Saxon Christianity; Germanic Christianity; medieval Christianity; political theology; theology of the cross; redemptive violence; contextualization
MDPI and ACS Style

Youngs, S.J. A Transcript of Submission: Jesus as Fated Victim of Divine Violence in the Old Saxon Heliand. Religions 2021, 12, 306. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12050306

AMA Style

Youngs SJ. A Transcript of Submission: Jesus as Fated Victim of Divine Violence in the Old Saxon Heliand. Religions. 2021; 12(5):306. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12050306

Chicago/Turabian Style

Youngs, Samuel J. 2021. "A Transcript of Submission: Jesus as Fated Victim of Divine Violence in the Old Saxon Heliand" Religions 12, no. 5: 306. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12050306

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