Next Article in Journal
Redemption of ‘Fallen’ Hero-Athletes: Lance Armstrong, Isaiah, and Doing Good while Being Bad
Previous Article in Journal
Reconstructing an Ethics of Credit in an Age of Neoliberalism
Open AccessArticle

Slow Religion: Literary Journalism as a Tool for Interreligious Dialogue

Blanquerna Observatory on Media, Religion and Culture, Ramon Llull University, Plaça Joan Coromines s/n, 08001 Barcelona, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Religions 2019, 10(8), 485; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel10080485
Received: 1 July 2019 / Revised: 9 August 2019 / Accepted: 13 August 2019 / Published: 18 August 2019
Intercultural and interfaith dialogue is one of the challenges faced by society. In a world marked by globalisation, digitisation, and migratory movements, the media is the agora for people of different faiths and beliefs. At the same time, the media is adapting to the online space. In this context, narrative journalism emerges, breaking the rules of technological immediacy and opting for a slow model based on the tradition of non-fiction journalism. With slow, background-based reporting and literary techniques, narrative journalism tells stories with all their aspects, giving voices to their protagonists. Is this genre a space in which to encounter the Other? Could narrative journalism be a tool for understanding? These are the questions that this research aims to investigate through the content analysis of 75 articles published in Jot Down, Gatopardo, and The New Yorker, along with 38 in-depth interviews with journalists associated to them. View Full-Text
Keywords: literary journalism; religion; slow journalism; slow religion; The New Yorker; Gatopardo; Jot Down literary journalism; religion; slow journalism; slow religion; The New Yorker; Gatopardo; Jot Down
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Sabaté Gauxachs, A.; Micó Sanz, J.L.; Díez Bosch, M. Slow Religion: Literary Journalism as a Tool for Interreligious Dialogue. Religions 2019, 10, 485.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop