Next Article in Journal
Slow Religion: Literary Journalism as a Tool for Interreligious Dialogue
Next Article in Special Issue
Pursuing Ethics by Building Bridges beyond the Northern Paradigm
Previous Article in Journal
The Centrality of Anti-Semitism in the Islamic State’s Ideology and Its Connection to Anti-Shiism
Previous Article in Special Issue
Transformational Ethics: The Concept of Obedience in Post-Conciliar Jesuit Thinking
Open AccessArticle

Reconstructing an Ethics of Credit in an Age of Neoliberalism

Department of Philosophy, North Park University, Chicago, IL 60625, USA
Religions 2019, 10(8), 484; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel10080484
Received: 30 July 2019 / Revised: 13 August 2019 / Accepted: 16 August 2019 / Published: 17 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Reenvisioning Christian Ethics)
One of the most formidable socio-economic challenges which Christian communities are facing today is the growing dominance of neoliberalism. From wheat fields in Brazil to Wall Street in New York City, neoliberalism is marching on everywhere with its massive credit (or credit money). The purpose of this paper is to address a key structural injustice of neoliberalism—the deepening colonization of “social capital” by “financial capital.” Since the 1980s, a new economic process known as “financialization” has structurally changed the global economic system entailing an extreme income and wealth gap between the haves and the have nots. It has also rendered a countless number of ordinary people vulnerable to various types of debt entrapment while destroying the environment on a global scale. Behind all these forms of social and natural disintegration lies a crucial neoliberal apparatus fueled by credit. This paper engages in such problems by attempting to reconnect the lost link between social capital and financial capital. In doing so, it first analyzes the genealogical origin of the separation between financial capital and social capital. The author then comes up with ethical principles to re-anchor financial capital in social capital through a critical and interdisciplinary exploration. View Full-Text
Keywords: social capital; financialization; financial capital; ethics of credit; neoliberalism; colonization; Christian ethics social capital; financialization; financial capital; ethics of credit; neoliberalism; colonization; Christian ethics
MDPI and ACS Style

Ahn, I. Reconstructing an Ethics of Credit in an Age of Neoliberalism. Religions 2019, 10, 484.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop