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Agriculture 2018, 8(3), 34; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture8030034

Market, Policies and Local Governance as Drivers of Environmental Public Benefits: The Case of the Localised Processed Tomato in Northern Italy

Consiglio per la Ricerca in Agricoltura e L’Analisi Dell’Economia Agraria—CREA (Council for Agricultural Research and Economics), 00198 Rome, Italy
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Received: 1 February 2018 / Revised: 20 February 2018 / Accepted: 21 February 2018 / Published: 28 February 2018
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Abstract

This article explores the role of a specific Localised Agri-food System (LAFS) in the provision of Environmental and social benefits (ESBs) in densely cultivated, industrialised, and populated areas by analysing the core of the processing tomato supply chain of northern Italy (Parma and Piacenza). The research examines how the interplay of market drivers, public policies, and collective actions favoured farming, technological, and organisational innovations geared to support long-term economic growth and tackle, at the same time, environmental challenges. The tomato supply chain is characterised by a favourable convergence of attitudes, policies, and market conditions that over time allowed for fruitful interactions between private stakeholders and between the supply chain and public players. Decades of key stakeholders’ interconnections within the tomato supply chain led to a success story of economic growth and attention to a new balance between agro-industry and environment, for the benefit of producers/processors, consumers, and natural resources. Profitability strategies inevitably imply intensification of farming in order to maximise profit levels per hectare, however, the tomato supply chain found a collective motivation that could grant profitability and concurrently reward producers and processors for attention paid to safeguarding the environment—giving evidence that intensification does not necessarily conflict with requirements in support of sustainability. View Full-Text
Keywords: localised agri-food systems; governance; quality schemes; sustainable agriculture; sustainable water management; water footprint; water use; water pollution localised agri-food systems; governance; quality schemes; sustainable agriculture; sustainable water management; water footprint; water use; water pollution
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Mantino, F.; Forcina, B. Market, Policies and Local Governance as Drivers of Environmental Public Benefits: The Case of the Localised Processed Tomato in Northern Italy. Agriculture 2018, 8, 34.

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