Next Article in Journal
Research Progress and Development of Mechanized Potato Planters: A Review
Next Article in Special Issue
Synthesizing Knowledge about Structural Change in Agriculture: The Integration of Disciplines and Aggregation Levels
Previous Article in Journal
Modal Analysis and Experiment of a Lycium barbarum L. Shrub for Efficient Vibration Harvesting of Fruit
Previous Article in Special Issue
Structural Changes in Israeli Family Farms: Long-Run Trends in the Farm Size Distribution and the Role of Part-Time Farming
Article

The Survival of Family Farms: Socioemotional Wealth (SEW) and Factors Affecting Intention to Continue the Business

Faculty of Law, Economics and Tourism, Universitat de Lleida, 25001 Lleida, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Ayal Kimhi
Agriculture 2021, 11(6), 520; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture11060520
Received: 14 April 2021 / Revised: 28 May 2021 / Accepted: 29 May 2021 / Published: 3 June 2021
This article addresses the problem of succession in family farms in a context of generational change. Family businesses are characterized by their long-term orientation and by having a positive effect through environmental goals that remain in place generation after generation. The general increase in average age among farmers is seen as a barrier to more sustainable land use, and the survival of family farming therefore depends on the availability of a successor in the family. Socioemotional wealth (hereafter, SEW) is understood as the affective endowment of family members. This study adopts the SEW dimensions conceptually validated to analyse the effects of psychological and socioeconomic factors on potential successors’ intentions. The results of a survey administered to students attending agricultural schools in Catalonia show that intentions to assume the management and ownership of the family farm increase in line with individuals’ interest in creating their own business, their ability to take over the farm, and their emotional inclination to continue the family legacy. In addition, SEW was measured in relation to the potential successor and not the incumbent, as has typically been the case in previous work, bringing this important research subject as a principal actor. Finally, an empirical validation of a short FIBER scale, i.e., REI scale, was obtained that relates individuals’ intentions to succeed the family farm to the socioemotional wealth of business families, testing suitability of the REI scale as a measure of intention to succeed. View Full-Text
Keywords: family farms; succession; continuity; socioemotional wealth family farms; succession; continuity; socioemotional wealth
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Plana-Farran, M.; Gallizo, J.L. The Survival of Family Farms: Socioemotional Wealth (SEW) and Factors Affecting Intention to Continue the Business. Agriculture 2021, 11, 520. https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture11060520

AMA Style

Plana-Farran M, Gallizo JL. The Survival of Family Farms: Socioemotional Wealth (SEW) and Factors Affecting Intention to Continue the Business. Agriculture. 2021; 11(6):520. https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture11060520

Chicago/Turabian Style

Plana-Farran, Manel, and José L. Gallizo 2021. "The Survival of Family Farms: Socioemotional Wealth (SEW) and Factors Affecting Intention to Continue the Business" Agriculture 11, no. 6: 520. https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture11060520

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop