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Open AccessArticle

Prognostic Value of Early Intermittent Electroencephalography in Patients after Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

1
Department of Emergency Medicine, Dankook University Hospital, Dankook University School of Medicine, Cheonan 31116, Korea
2
Department of Critical Care Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 06351, Korea
3
Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 06351, Korea
4
Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 06351, Korea
5
Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 06351, Korea
6
Department of Neurosurgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 06351, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(6), 1745; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9061745
Received: 18 May 2020 / Revised: 30 May 2020 / Accepted: 3 June 2020 / Published: 4 June 2020
The aim of this study was to investigate whether early intermittent electroencephalography (EEG) could be used to predict neurological prognosis of patients who underwent extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR). This was a retrospective and observational study of adult patients who were evaluated by EEG scan within 96 h after ECPR. The primary endpoint was neurological status upon discharge from the hospital assessed with a Cerebral Performance Categories (CPC) scale. Among 69 adult cardiac arrest patients who underwent ECPR, 17 (24.6%) patients had favorable neurological outcomes (CPC score of 1 or 2). Malignant EEG patterns were more common in patients with poor neurological outcomes (CPC score of 3, 4 or 5) than in patients with favorable neurological outcomes (73.1% vs. 5.9%, p < 0.001). All patients with highly malignant EEG patterns (43.5%) had poor neurological outcomes. In multivariable analysis, malignant EEG patterns and duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation were significantly associated with poor neurological outcomes. In this study, malignant EEG patterns within 96 h after cardiac arrest were significantly associated with poor neurological outcomes. Therefore, an early intermittent EEG scan could be helpful for predicting neurological prognosis of post-cardiac arrest patients after ECPR. View Full-Text
Keywords: cardiopulmonary resuscitation; extracorporeal membrane oxygenation; neurological prognosis; electroencephalography cardiopulmonary resuscitation; extracorporeal membrane oxygenation; neurological prognosis; electroencephalography
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Kim, Y.O.; Ko, R.-E.; Chung, C.R.; Yang, J.H.; Park, T.K.; Cho, Y.H.; Sung, K.; Suh, G.Y.; Ryu, J.-A. Prognostic Value of Early Intermittent Electroencephalography in Patients after Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation. J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 1745.

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