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Article

The Healthy Pregnancy Service to Optimise Excess Gestational Weight Gain for Women with Obesity: A Qualitative Study of Health Professionals’ Perspectives

1
Monash Centre for Health Research and Implementation, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Clayton 3168, Australia
2
Diabetes and Vascular Medicine Unit, Monash Health, Clayton 3168, Australia
3
Monash Women’s, Monash Health, Clayton 3168, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(12), 4073; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9124073
Received: 23 November 2020 / Revised: 12 December 2020 / Accepted: 14 December 2020 / Published: 17 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Prevention of Maternal Obesity: Lifestyle Health and Beyond)
Maternal obesity is associated with health risks for women and their babies, exacerbated by excess gestational weight gain. We describe health professionals’ perspectives in the provision of a Healthy Pregnancy service designed to optimise healthy lifestyle and support recommended gestational weight gain for women with obesity. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with health professionals. Questions were based on the Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) and deductive thematic analysis was performed. A total of 14 multidisciplinary staff were interviewed. Six themes were identified: 1. health professionals view themselves as part of a team; 2. health professionals reported having necessary skills; 3. experience generated confidence in discussing gestational weight gain; 4. gestational weight gain is considered of variable importance; 5. health professionals want women to be comfortable; 6. the environmental context and resources presented some barriers. Staff were supportive of the Healthy Pregnancy service and valued developing teamwork with staff and rapport with women. Most felt relatively comfortable discussing weight gain with women. Barriers included ability to navigate sensitive topics with women, limited awareness of the intervention among new staff, communication between teams, and waiting time for women. Barriers and enablers to the delivery of an integrated model of maternity care were identified. These findings should inform and improve implementation of service models integrating healthy lifestyle in the antenatal care of women with obesity. View Full-Text
Keywords: gestational weight gain; obesity; midwives; obstetricians; health coach; intervention; implementation; qualitative; health professionals gestational weight gain; obesity; midwives; obstetricians; health coach; intervention; implementation; qualitative; health professionals
MDPI and ACS Style

Goldstein, R.F.; Walker, R.E.; Teede, H.J.; Harrison, C.L.; Boyle, J.A. The Healthy Pregnancy Service to Optimise Excess Gestational Weight Gain for Women with Obesity: A Qualitative Study of Health Professionals’ Perspectives. J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 4073. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9124073

AMA Style

Goldstein RF, Walker RE, Teede HJ, Harrison CL, Boyle JA. The Healthy Pregnancy Service to Optimise Excess Gestational Weight Gain for Women with Obesity: A Qualitative Study of Health Professionals’ Perspectives. Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2020; 9(12):4073. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9124073

Chicago/Turabian Style

Goldstein, Rebecca F., Ruth E. Walker, Helena J. Teede, Cheryce L. Harrison, and Jacqueline A. Boyle. 2020. "The Healthy Pregnancy Service to Optimise Excess Gestational Weight Gain for Women with Obesity: A Qualitative Study of Health Professionals’ Perspectives" Journal of Clinical Medicine 9, no. 12: 4073. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9124073

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