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Open AccessArticle

The GERtality Score: The Development of a Simple Tool to Help Predict in-Hospital Mortality in Geriatric Trauma Patients

1
Department of Traumatology, University Hospital of Zürich, 8091 Zürich, Switzerland
2
Institute for Research in Operative Medicine (IFOM), University of Witten/Herdecke, 58453 Cologne, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Roman Pfeifer
J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10(7), 1362; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10071362
Received: 8 February 2021 / Revised: 11 March 2021 / Accepted: 22 March 2021 / Published: 25 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Management and Challenges in Polytrauma)
Feasible and predictive scoring systems for severely injured geriatric patients are lacking. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop a scoring system for the prediction of in-hospital mortality in severely injured geriatric trauma patients. The TraumaRegister DGU® (TR-DGU) was utilized. European geriatric patients (≥65 years) admitted between 2008 and 2017 were included. Relevant patient variables were implemented in the GERtality score. By conducting a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, a comparison with the Geriatric Trauma Outcome Score (GTOS) and the Revised Injury Severity Classification II (RISC-II) Score was performed. A total of 58,055 geriatric trauma patients (mean age: 77 years) were included. Univariable analysis led to the following variables: age ≥ 80 years, need for packed red blood cells (PRBC) transfusion prior to intensive care unit (ICU), American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score ≥ 3, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) ≤ 13, Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) in any body region ≥ 4. The maximum GERtality score was 5 points. A mortality rate of 72.4% was calculated in patients with the maximum GERtality score. Mortality rates of 65.1 and 47.5% were encountered in patients with GERtality scores of 4 and 3 points, respectively. The area under the curve (AUC) of the novel GERtality score was 0.803 (GTOS: 0.784; RISC-II: 0.879). The novel GERtality score is a simple and feasible score that enables an adequate prediction of the probability of mortality in polytraumatized geriatric patients by using only five specific parameters. View Full-Text
Keywords: geriatric trauma; scoring; polytrauma; ISS; AIS; geriatric patients; orthogeriatric geriatric trauma; scoring; polytrauma; ISS; AIS; geriatric patients; orthogeriatric
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MDPI and ACS Style

Scherer, J.; Kalbas, Y.; Ziegenhain, F.; Neuhaus, V.; Lefering, R.; Teuben, M.; Sprengel, K.; Pape, H.-C.; Jensen, K.O. The GERtality Score: The Development of a Simple Tool to Help Predict in-Hospital Mortality in Geriatric Trauma Patients. J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10, 1362. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10071362

AMA Style

Scherer J, Kalbas Y, Ziegenhain F, Neuhaus V, Lefering R, Teuben M, Sprengel K, Pape H-C, Jensen KO. The GERtality Score: The Development of a Simple Tool to Help Predict in-Hospital Mortality in Geriatric Trauma Patients. Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2021; 10(7):1362. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10071362

Chicago/Turabian Style

Scherer, Julian; Kalbas, Yannik; Ziegenhain, Franziska; Neuhaus, Valentin; Lefering, Rolf; Teuben, Michel; Sprengel, Kai; Pape, Hans-Christoph; Jensen, Kai O. 2021. "The GERtality Score: The Development of a Simple Tool to Help Predict in-Hospital Mortality in Geriatric Trauma Patients" J. Clin. Med. 10, no. 7: 1362. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10071362

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