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A Cognitive Behavioral Therapy-Informed Self-Management Program for Acute Respiratory Failure Survivors: A Feasibility Study

1
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA
2
Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA
3
Outcomes after Critical Illness and Surgery (OACIS) Research Group, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA
4
Department of Psychology, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD 21250, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Shigeaki Inoue
J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10(4), 872; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10040872
Received: 28 December 2020 / Revised: 12 February 2021 / Accepted: 16 February 2021 / Published: 20 February 2021
Background: The number of people surviving critical illness is rising rapidly around the globe. Survivorship comes at a cost, with approximately half of patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF) experiencing clinically significant symptoms of anxiety, and 32–40% of survivors having substantial anxiety symptoms in the months or years after hospitalization. Methods: This feasibility study reports on 11 consecutive ARF patients receiving up to six sessions of a psychological intervention for self-management of anxiety. Results: All 11 patients accepted and received the psychological intervention. Four patients did not fully complete all 6 sessions due to death (n = 1, 2 sessions completed), and early hospital discharge (n = 3, patients completed 2, 3 and 5 sessions). The median (IQR) score (range: 0–100; minimal clinically important difference: 13) for the Visual Analog Scale-Anxiety (VAS-A) pre-intervention was 70 (57, 75) points. During the intervention, all 11 patients had a decrease in VAS-A, with a median (IQR) decrease of 44 (19, 48) points. Conclusions: This self-management intervention appears acceptable and feasible to implement among ARF patients during and after an ICU stay. View Full-Text
Keywords: critical care; critical care outcomes; intensive care units; anxiety; cognitive behavior therapies critical care; critical care outcomes; intensive care units; anxiety; cognitive behavior therapies
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hosey, M.M.; Wegener, S.T.; Hinkle, C.; Needham, D.M. A Cognitive Behavioral Therapy-Informed Self-Management Program for Acute Respiratory Failure Survivors: A Feasibility Study. J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10, 872. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10040872

AMA Style

Hosey MM, Wegener ST, Hinkle C, Needham DM. A Cognitive Behavioral Therapy-Informed Self-Management Program for Acute Respiratory Failure Survivors: A Feasibility Study. Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2021; 10(4):872. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10040872

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hosey, Megan M., Stephen T. Wegener, Caroline Hinkle, and Dale M. Needham. 2021. "A Cognitive Behavioral Therapy-Informed Self-Management Program for Acute Respiratory Failure Survivors: A Feasibility Study" Journal of Clinical Medicine 10, no. 4: 872. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10040872

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