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Structural Characterisation of Deposit Layer during Milk Protein Microfiltration by Means of In-Situ MRI and Compositional Analysis

1
Chair of Food and Bioprocess Engineering, Technical University of Munich, Weihenstephaner Berg 1, 85354 Freising, Germany
2
Institute of Mechanical Process Engineering and Mechanics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76131 Karlsruhe, Germany
3
Chair of Water Chemistry and Water Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76131 Karlsruhe, Germany
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
First and second author contributed equally.
Membranes 2020, 10(4), 59; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes10040059
Received: 3 March 2020 / Revised: 24 March 2020 / Accepted: 28 March 2020 / Published: 31 March 2020
Milk protein fractionation by microfiltration membranes is an established but still growing field in dairy technology. Even under cross-flow conditions, this filtration process is impaired by the formation of a deposit by the retained protein fraction, mainly casein micelles. Due to deposition formation and consequently increased overall filtration resistance, the mass flow of the smaller whey protein fraction declines within the first few minutes of filtration. Currently, there are only a handful of analytical techniques available for the direct observation of deposit formation with opaque feed media and membranes. Here, we report on the ongoing development of a non-invasive and non-destructive method based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and its application to characterise deposit layer formation during milk protein fractionation in ceramic hollow fibre membranes as a function of filtration pressure and temperature, temporally and spatially resolved. In addition, the chemical composition of the deposit was analysed by reversed phase high pressure liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). We correlate the structural information gained by in-situ MRI with the protein amount and composition of the deposit layer obtained by RP-HPLC. We show that the combination of in-situ MRI and chemical analysis by RP-HPLC has the potential to allow for a better scientific understanding of the pressure and temperature dependence of deposit layer formation. View Full-Text
Keywords: fouling; fractionation; casein; whey protein; filtration resistance fouling; fractionation; casein; whey protein; filtration resistance
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Schopf, R.; Schork, N.; Amling, E.; Nirschl, H.; Guthausen, G.; Kulozik, U. Structural Characterisation of Deposit Layer during Milk Protein Microfiltration by Means of In-Situ MRI and Compositional Analysis. Membranes 2020, 10, 59.

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