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Objectifying “Pain” in the Modern Neurosciences: A Historical Account of the Visualization Technologies Used in the Development of an “Algesiogenic Pathology”, 1850 to 2000

Department of Community Health Sciences & Department of History, The University of Calgary, 3280 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary T2N 4Z6, AB, Canada
Academic Editor: Patrick W. Stroman
Brain Sci. 2015, 5(4), 521-545; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci5040521
Received: 31 August 2015 / Revised: 30 October 2015 / Accepted: 9 November 2015 / Published: 17 November 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Neuroimaging of Pain)
Particularly with the fundamental works of the Leipzig school of experimental psychophysiology (between the 1850s and 1880s), the modern neurosciences witnessed an increasing interest in attempts to objectify “pain” as a bodily signal and physiological value. This development has led to refined psychological test repertoires and new clinical measurement techniques, which became progressively paired with imaging approaches and sophisticated theories about neuropathological pain etiology. With the advent of electroencephalography since the middle of the 20th century, and through the use of brain stimulation technologies and modern neuroimaging, the chosen scientific route towards an ever more refined “objectification” of pain phenomena took firm root in Western medicine. This article provides a broad overview of landmark events and key imaging technologies, which represent the long developmental path of a field that could be called “algesiogenic pathology.” View Full-Text
Keywords: pain; history of medicine; Leipzig; Montreal; New York; nineteenth century; precursors to functional neuroimaging of pain; twentieth century pain; history of medicine; Leipzig; Montreal; New York; nineteenth century; precursors to functional neuroimaging of pain; twentieth century
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Stahnisch, F.W. Objectifying “Pain” in the Modern Neurosciences: A Historical Account of the Visualization Technologies Used in the Development of an “Algesiogenic Pathology”, 1850 to 2000. Brain Sci. 2015, 5, 521-545.

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