Next Article in Journal
Postoperative Pneumocephalus on Computed Tomography Might Predict Post-Corpus Callosotomy Chemical Meningitis
Next Article in Special Issue
Brain Structure and Functional Connectivity Correlate with Psychosocial Development in Contemplative Practitioners and Controls
Previous Article in Journal
A Randomized Computer-Assisted Rehabilitation Trial of Attention in Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis: A Post Hoc Analysis
Previous Article in Special Issue
The Lost Neural Hierarchy of the Autistic Self—Locked-Out of the Mental Self and Its Default-Mode Network
Case Report

The Role of White Matter Disconnection in the Symptoms Relating to the Anarchic Hand Syndrome: A Single Case Study

1
Npsy.Lab-VR, Dipartimento di Scienze Umane, Università di Verona, Lungadige Porta Vittoria, 17-37129 Verona, Italy
2
Brain Connectivity and Behaviour Laboratory, Sorbonne Universities, 75006 Paris, France
3
Groupe d’Imagerie Neurofonctionnelle, Institut des Maladies Neurodégénératives-UMR 5293, CNRS, CEA University of Bordeaux, 33076 Bordeaux, France
4
Neuroradiology, AOUVR Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Integrata di Verona, Piazzale Stefani, 1-37126 Verona, Italy
5
IRCSS, Ospedale Sacro Cuore-Don Calabria, Via Rizzardi, 4-37024 Negrar di Valpolicella, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Istvan Molnar-Szakacs and Lucina Q. Uddin
Brain Sci. 2021, 11(5), 632; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11050632
Received: 16 March 2021 / Revised: 10 May 2021 / Accepted: 11 May 2021 / Published: 14 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Brain Bases of Conscious Awareness and Self-Representation)
The anarchic hand syndrome refers to an inability to control the movements of one’s own hand, which acts as if it has a will of its own. The symptoms may differ depending on whether the brain lesion is anterior, posterior, callosal or subcortical, but the relative classifications are not conclusive. This study investigates the role of white matter disconnections in a patient whose symptoms are inconsistent with the mapping of the lesion site. A repeated neuropsychological investigation was associated with a review of the literature on the topic to identify the frequency of various different symptoms relating to this syndrome. Furthermore, an analysis of the neuroimaging regarding structural connectivity allowed us to investigate the grey matter lesions and white matter disconnections. The results indicated that some of the patient’s symptoms were associated with structures that, although not directly damaged, were dysfunctional due to a disconnection in their networks. This suggests that the anarchic hand may be considered as a disconnection syndrome involving the integration of multiple antero-posterior, insular and interhemispheric networks. In order to comprehend this rare syndrome better, the clinical and neuroimaging data need to be integrated with the clinical reports available in the literature on this topic. View Full-Text
Keywords: anarchic hand syndrome; DTI; white matter disconnection; lesion mapping; sense of agency; posterior lesions anarchic hand syndrome; DTI; white matter disconnection; lesion mapping; sense of agency; posterior lesions
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Pacella, V.; Ricciardi, G.K.; Bonadiman, S.; Verzini, E.; Faraoni, F.; Scandola, M.; Moro, V. The Role of White Matter Disconnection in the Symptoms Relating to the Anarchic Hand Syndrome: A Single Case Study. Brain Sci. 2021, 11, 632. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11050632

AMA Style

Pacella V, Ricciardi GK, Bonadiman S, Verzini E, Faraoni F, Scandola M, Moro V. The Role of White Matter Disconnection in the Symptoms Relating to the Anarchic Hand Syndrome: A Single Case Study. Brain Sciences. 2021; 11(5):632. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11050632

Chicago/Turabian Style

Pacella, Valentina, Giuseppe K. Ricciardi, Silvia Bonadiman, Elisabetta Verzini, Federica Faraoni, Michele Scandola, and Valentina Moro. 2021. "The Role of White Matter Disconnection in the Symptoms Relating to the Anarchic Hand Syndrome: A Single Case Study" Brain Sciences 11, no. 5: 632. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11050632

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop