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Open AccessArticle

Practical Quantum Bit Commitment Protocol Based on Quantum Oblivious Transfer

by 1,2,3 and 1,2,3,*
1
State Key Laboratory of Information Security, Institute of Information Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100093, China
2
Data Assurance and Communication Security Research Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100093, China
3
School of Cyber Security, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(10), 1990; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8101990
Received: 14 September 2018 / Revised: 1 October 2018 / Accepted: 2 October 2018 / Published: 19 October 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical High-speed Information Technology)
Oblivious transfer (OT) and bit commitment (BC) are two-party cryptographic protocols which play crucial roles in the construction of various cryptographic protocols. We propose three practical quantum cryptographic protocols in this paper. We first construct a practical quantum random oblivious transfer (R-OT) protocol based on the fact that non-orthogonal states cannot be reliably distinguished. Then, we construct a fault-tolerant one-out-of-two oblivious transfer ( O T 1 2 ) protocol based on the quantum R-OT protocol. Afterwards, we propose a quantum bit commitment (QBC) protocol which executes the fault-tolerant O T 1 2 several times. Mayers, Lo and Chau (MLC) no-go theorem proves that QBC protocol cannot be unconditionally secure. However, we find that computing the unitary transformation of no-go theorem attack needs so many resources that it is not realistically implementable. We give a definition of physical security for QBC protocols and prove that the practical QBC we proposed is physically secure and can be implemented in the real world. View Full-Text
Keywords: quantum cryptography; oblivious transfer; bit commitment; practical protocol; physical security quantum cryptography; oblivious transfer; bit commitment; practical protocol; physical security
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MDPI and ACS Style

Song, Y.; Yang, L. Practical Quantum Bit Commitment Protocol Based on Quantum Oblivious Transfer. Appl. Sci. 2018, 8, 1990. https://doi.org/10.3390/app8101990

AMA Style

Song Y, Yang L. Practical Quantum Bit Commitment Protocol Based on Quantum Oblivious Transfer. Applied Sciences. 2018; 8(10):1990. https://doi.org/10.3390/app8101990

Chicago/Turabian Style

Song, Yaqi; Yang, Li. 2018. "Practical Quantum Bit Commitment Protocol Based on Quantum Oblivious Transfer" Appl. Sci. 8, no. 10: 1990. https://doi.org/10.3390/app8101990

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