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Open AccessArticle

Antenna/Body Coupling in the Near-Field at 60 GHz: Impact on the Absorbed Power Density

IETR (Institut d’Électronique et des Technologies du Numérique), French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), University of Rennes-UMR 6164, F-35000 Rennes, France
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Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(21), 7392; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10217392
Received: 24 September 2020 / Revised: 15 October 2020 / Accepted: 18 October 2020 / Published: 22 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Exposure in 5G and 6G Scenarios)
Wireless devices, such as smartphones, tablets, and laptops, are intended to be used in the vicinity of the human body. When an antenna is placed close to a lossy medium, near-field interactions may modify the electromagnetic field distribution. Here, we analyze analytically and numerically the impact of antenna/human body interactions on the transmitted power density (TPD) at 60 GHz using a skin-equivalent model. To this end, several scenarios of increasing complexity are considered: plane-wave illumination, equivalent source, and patch antenna arrays. Our results demonstrate that, for all considered scenarios, the presence of the body in the vicinity of a source results in an increase in the average TPD. The local TPD enhancement due to the body presence close to a patch antenna array reaches 95.5% for an adult (dry skin). The variations are higher for wet skin (up to 98.25%) and for children (up to 103.3%). Both absolute value and spatial distribution of TPD are altered by the antenna/body coupling. These results suggest that the exact distribution of TPD cannot be retrieved from measurements of the incident power density in free-space in absence of the body. Therefore, for accurate measurements of the absorbed and epithelial power density (metrics used as the main dosimetric quantities at frequencies > 6 GHz), it is important to perform measurements under conditions where the wireless device under test is perturbed in the same way as by the presence of the human body in realistic use case scenarios. View Full-Text
Keywords: exposure assessment; millimeter waves; antennas; near-field interactions; dosimetry; power density exposure assessment; millimeter waves; antennas; near-field interactions; dosimetry; power density
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ziane, M.; Sauleau, R.; Zhadobov, M. Antenna/Body Coupling in the Near-Field at 60 GHz: Impact on the Absorbed Power Density. Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 7392. https://doi.org/10.3390/app10217392

AMA Style

Ziane M, Sauleau R, Zhadobov M. Antenna/Body Coupling in the Near-Field at 60 GHz: Impact on the Absorbed Power Density. Applied Sciences. 2020; 10(21):7392. https://doi.org/10.3390/app10217392

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ziane, Massinissa; Sauleau, Ronan; Zhadobov, Maxim. 2020. "Antenna/Body Coupling in the Near-Field at 60 GHz: Impact on the Absorbed Power Density" Appl. Sci. 10, no. 21: 7392. https://doi.org/10.3390/app10217392

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