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Adm. Sci., Volume 8, Issue 1 (March 2018)

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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Ascending: An Exploration of Women’s Leadership Advancement in the Role of Board of Trustee Chair
Adm. Sci. 2018, 8(1), 7; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci8010007
Received: 20 December 2017 / Revised: 20 February 2018 / Accepted: 9 March 2018 / Published: 14 March 2018
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Abstract
While women have made strides in leadership in the higher education sector there continues to be dismal representation of women in executive level roles of governance at colleges and universities. This article presents findings from a study that explored skills that women have
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While women have made strides in leadership in the higher education sector there continues to be dismal representation of women in executive level roles of governance at colleges and universities. This article presents findings from a study that explored skills that women have identified as being useful in their ascent to the role of trustee board chair. The ascension patterns of the participants are explored through a qualitative process to provide a path to success for other women to follow. The article concludes with suggestions for increasing the number of women serving in the capacity of board chair. Full article
Open AccessArticle Firm Readiness Level for Innovation Projects: A New Decision-Making Tool for Innovation Managers
Adm. Sci. 2018, 8(1), 6; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci8010006
Received: 5 January 2018 / Revised: 16 February 2018 / Accepted: 7 March 2018 / Published: 11 March 2018
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Abstract
Innovation projects represent a major challenge for business managers due to their associated uncertainty degree. The already existing methodologies to support the innovation projects are aimed at piloting them and establishing the management stages in a flexible and agile way during their deployment.
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Innovation projects represent a major challenge for business managers due to their associated uncertainty degree. The already existing methodologies to support the innovation projects are aimed at piloting them and establishing the management stages in a flexible and agile way during their deployment. This paper proposes a complementary ex-ante methodology that seeks to aid the decision-making of companies to choose whether or not to launch a potential innovation project. This methodology evaluates to what extent the technological system of the company has the minimum required maturity degree of competencies to successfully achieve the innovation project. Thus, in first instance, an innovation project is characterized according to its novelty degree; both inside the company and in its environment. Subsequently, according to the previous characterization, the future project will have an impact on the technological system of the company. The capabilities of the firm are represented by a set of good practices associated with the innovation projects’ management that the company is able to deploy. Finally, the minimum maturity degree required by a particular project of these practices is determined. Then, the gap between the maturity requirement profile and the current profile of the company is established enabling to decide on the implementation of the project or not. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Frank and Fearless: Supporting Academic Career Progression for Women in an Australian Program
Adm. Sci. 2018, 8(1), 5; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci8010005
Received: 20 December 2017 / Revised: 10 February 2018 / Accepted: 22 February 2018 / Published: 27 February 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (540 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The underrepresentation of women in senior positions continues to be a major challenge in higher education and most other industries. In Australia, the career trajectory for academic women stalls at a lower level than that of their male counterparts. Concern about this situation
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The underrepresentation of women in senior positions continues to be a major challenge in higher education and most other industries. In Australia, the career trajectory for academic women stalls at a lower level than that of their male counterparts. Concern about this situation in one Australian university led to the design and delivery of a career progression program to support women’s advancement from senior lecturer to associate professor. This study details the main features of the program, designed to facilitate women’s transition from being leading academics to academic leaders through a focus on leadership and career progression. We report the participants’ perceptions of its value based on survey data. We conclude that leadership development is difficult work and requires a supportive environment where risk-taking is encouraged, where frank and fearless feedback is provided, and where the individual is required to examine assumptions and biases and to assume a leadership identity. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Corruption in Organizations: Ethical Climate and Individual Motives
Adm. Sci. 2018, 8(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci8010004
Received: 22 December 2017 / Revised: 13 February 2018 / Accepted: 14 February 2018 / Published: 19 February 2018
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Abstract
The aim of this research was to examine how organizational and individual factors, in concert, shape corruption. We examined whether the ethical climate of organizations is related to corruption, and if so, whether it affects corruption through individual motives for corruption. A large-scale
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The aim of this research was to examine how organizational and individual factors, in concert, shape corruption. We examined whether the ethical climate of organizations is related to corruption, and if so, whether it affects corruption through individual motives for corruption. A large-scale questionnaire study was conducted among public officials (n = 234) and business employees (n = 289) who were in a position to make corrupt decisions. The findings suggest that public and private sector employees who perceive their organizational climate as more egoistic and less ethical are more prone to corruption. This relationship was fully mediated by individual motives, specifically by personal and social norms on corruption. These results indicate that employees who perceive their organization’s ethical climate as more egoistic and less ethical experience weaker personal and social norms to refrain from corruption, making them more corruption-prone. Hence, strategies addressing the interplay between organizational factors and individual motives seem promising in curbing corruption. To effectively withhold employees from engaging in corruption, organizations could deploy measures that strengthen an organizations’ ethical climate and encourage ethical decision-making based on concern for the wellbeing of others, as well as measures increasing the strength of personal and social norms to refrain from corruption. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Improved Methods for Predicting the Financial Vulnerability of Nonprofit Organizations
Adm. Sci. 2018, 8(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci8010003
Received: 18 September 2017 / Revised: 30 January 2018 / Accepted: 14 February 2018 / Published: 17 February 2018
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Abstract
Using hazard analysis procedures, this study undertakes a longitudinal examination of Israeli Nonprofit Organizations’ (NPOs’) financial vulnerability arising from governmental funding instability. Funding instability is characterized by time-at-risk, which measures the level of financial instability faced by an NPO and reflects the different
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Using hazard analysis procedures, this study undertakes a longitudinal examination of Israeli Nonprofit Organizations’ (NPOs’) financial vulnerability arising from governmental funding instability. Funding instability is characterized by time-at-risk, which measures the level of financial instability faced by an NPO and reflects the different funding situations it encounters. The vulnerability is expressed by the hazard rate (HR), which measures the speed at which NPOs’ close at a given point in time. The probability of an NPO failure is then estimated. The improvements presented in the current work are concerned with the methods of estimation of time at risk, which is a key variable in the hazard analysis, and testing a robustness of the method. The generalized time-at-risk, which measures the “level of instability” more consistently reflecting different situations encountered by a NPO, is introduced. The definition of generalized time-at-risk contains arbitrary coefficients whose values the current study determines using some optimization procedure. The optimization incorporates the idea of testing a possibility of using the results for predicting financial vulnerability by dividing the set of 2660 NPOs into two approximately equivalent samples. The coefficients in the time-at-risk definition are optimized by minimizing the average distance between the HR–time-at-risk curves based on these two samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nonprofit Management in Transition)
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Open AccessArticle Workplace Integration: Key Considerations for Internationally Educated Nurses and Employers
Adm. Sci. 2018, 8(1), 2; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci8010002
Received: 21 November 2017 / Revised: 6 February 2018 / Accepted: 7 February 2018 / Published: 11 February 2018
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Abstract
Integration of internationally educated nurses (IENs) in the workplace over the long term, has not been a clear focus in nursing. The role of the employer organization in facilitating workplace integration for IENs has also not been emphasized in research. The overall aim
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Integration of internationally educated nurses (IENs) in the workplace over the long term, has not been a clear focus in nursing. The role of the employer organization in facilitating workplace integration for IENs has also not been emphasized in research. The overall aim of this paper is to highlight findings from an instrumental qualitative case study research informed by critical social theory, which examined workplace integration of IENs. The study explored what is meant by ‘integration’ and how the employer organizational context affects workplace integration of IENs. A purposeful sample of twenty-eight participants was involved. The participants included: stakeholders from various vantage points within the case organization as well as IENs from diverse backgrounds who were beyond the process of transitioning into the Canadian workplace—they had worked in Canada for an average of eleven years. Four methods of data collection were used: semi-structured interviews; socio-demographic survey; review of documents; and focus group discussions (FGDs). Thematic analysis methods guided the within subcase analysis first, followed by an across subcase analysis. FGDs were used as a platform for member-checking to establish the credibility of study findings. The resulting definition and conceptual framework point to workplace integration of IENs as a two-way process requiring efforts on the part of the IENs as well as the employer organization. This paper elaborates on selected themes of how beyond transition, workplace integration entails IENs progressing on their leadership journey, while persevering to overcome challenges. Organizational factors such as workforce diversity, leadership commitment to equity and engagement with the broader community serve as critical enablers and the importance of workplaces striving to avoid common pitfalls in addressing the priority of IEN integration are also discussed. This paper concludes with implications and key considerations for workplace integration of IENs. Full article
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Open AccessEditorial Acknowledgement to Reviewers of Administrative Sciences in 2017
Adm. Sci. 2018, 8(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci8010001
Received: 10 January 2018 / Revised: 10 January 2018 / Accepted: 10 January 2018 / Published: 10 January 2018
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Abstract
Peer review is an essential part in the publication process, ensuring that Administrative Sciences maintains high quality standards for its published papers.[...] Full article
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