Nonprofit Management in Transition

A special issue of Administrative Sciences (ISSN 2076-3387).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2017) | Viewed by 21641

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Human Services, University of Haifa, Mount Carmel, Haifa 31905, Israel
Interests: nonprofit organizational and management issues; accountability; networking; volunteer HR practices and recruitment; organizational change and crisis and lobbying

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nonprofit management is both an academic field of study and a profession. Nonprofit management is unique in a wide range of management issues, including accountability, networking, volunteer HR practices and recruitment, organizational change and crisis, performance, and lobbying.

Nonprofit management includes theories that explain the nature and the behaviour of non-profit organizations and describe their role in society.

Nonprofit management reflects the effect of internal and external constraints. The relationship with the government and business settings, the application of for-profit practices and the adoption of efficient practices in times of economic crisis, as well as the development of HR practices.

In the present Special Issue, we seek to cover empirical and conceptual studies in the area of Nonprofit management. We welcome contributions—empirical, conceptual and case studies related to all the above and not only aspects of non-profit management. We are particularly interested on the evolution of management practices following the global economic crisis. How have non-profit organizations responded, what administrative changes have been introduced, and what measures of success they use to assess the degree of performance?

Prof. Dr. Rita Mano
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • accountability
  • networking
  • volunteer HR practices and recruitment
  • organizational change and crisis
  • performance and lobbying non-profit marketing
  • stakeholder relations

Published Papers (4 papers)

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8 pages, 575 KiB  
Article
Improved Methods for Predicting the Financial Vulnerability of Nonprofit Organizations
by Gila Burde
Adm. Sci. 2018, 8(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci8010003 - 17 Feb 2018
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 4163
Abstract
Using hazard analysis procedures, this study undertakes a longitudinal examination of Israeli Nonprofit Organizations’ (NPOs’) financial vulnerability arising from governmental funding instability. Funding instability is characterized by time-at-risk, which measures the level of financial instability faced by an NPO and reflects the different [...] Read more.
Using hazard analysis procedures, this study undertakes a longitudinal examination of Israeli Nonprofit Organizations’ (NPOs’) financial vulnerability arising from governmental funding instability. Funding instability is characterized by time-at-risk, which measures the level of financial instability faced by an NPO and reflects the different funding situations it encounters. The vulnerability is expressed by the hazard rate (HR), which measures the speed at which NPOs’ close at a given point in time. The probability of an NPO failure is then estimated. The improvements presented in the current work are concerned with the methods of estimation of time at risk, which is a key variable in the hazard analysis, and testing a robustness of the method. The generalized time-at-risk, which measures the “level of instability” more consistently reflecting different situations encountered by a NPO, is introduced. The definition of generalized time-at-risk contains arbitrary coefficients whose values the current study determines using some optimization procedure. The optimization incorporates the idea of testing a possibility of using the results for predicting financial vulnerability by dividing the set of 2660 NPOs into two approximately equivalent samples. The coefficients in the time-at-risk definition are optimized by minimizing the average distance between the HR–time-at-risk curves based on these two samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nonprofit Management in Transition)
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209 KiB  
Article
Exploring Lobbying Practices in Israel’s Nonprofit Advocacy Organizations: An Application of the Libby Lobbying Model
by Patricia Libby, Laura Deitrick and Rita Mano
Adm. Sci. 2017, 7(4), 37; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci7040037 - 24 Oct 2017
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3851
Abstract
Nonprofit and voluntary associations around the world are the primary vehicle for representing the voices of citizens in the policy-making process. As scholars who are committed to advancing the role of civil society and the citizen, it is incumbent upon us to provide [...] Read more.
Nonprofit and voluntary associations around the world are the primary vehicle for representing the voices of citizens in the policy-making process. As scholars who are committed to advancing the role of civil society and the citizen, it is incumbent upon us to provide theoretical and practical frameworks that can assist nonprofits with this important work. In developed nations, the similarity between societal values and structures in democratic countries makes it possible to assess and advance best practices for policy advocacy regardless of the origin of those advocacy models. This research introduces a recently developed conceptual framework originally deployed to diagnose nonprofit organizations in the U.S. engaged in legislative advocacy. Applied to 12 Israeli nonprofit organizations involved in legislative advocacy and seeking to advance change through the legislative process, this paper assesses and expands the proposed model confirming that most facets of the U.S. framework were commonly used by Israeli nonprofits. There is also evidence that culturally embedded norms are the main source for deviations from the model applied in the U.S. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nonprofit Management in Transition)
179 KiB  
Article
Classification of Program Activities: How Nonprofits Create Social Value
by William Brown
Adm. Sci. 2017, 7(2), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci7020012 - 17 May 2017
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 5328
Abstract
This paper defines and describes a framework to classify program activities utilized by nonprofit organizations to achieve public benefit objectives. Drawing on theory and practice from strategy, nonprofit management, and program planning, the paper proposes five program activities differentiated by the value created. [...] Read more.
This paper defines and describes a framework to classify program activities utilized by nonprofit organizations to achieve public benefit objectives. Drawing on theory and practice from strategy, nonprofit management, and program planning, the paper proposes five program activities differentiated by the value created. Several factors define and differentiate the approaches and serve as decision areas for nonprofit managers when developing program strategies. Classifying program activities facilitates further research as it provides a common language and framework to analyze strategic choices enacted in nonprofit organizations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nonprofit Management in Transition)

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594 KiB  
Commentary
Social Impact Bonds and the Perils of Aligned Interests
by Florentine Maier and Michael Meyer
Adm. Sci. 2017, 7(3), 24; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci7030024 - 15 Jul 2017
Cited by 39 | Viewed by 7719
Abstract
Social impact bonds (SIBs) have been welcomed enthusiastically as a new funding tool for social innovation, yet also condemned as an instrument that neglects beneficiaries’ and taxpayers’ interests, opening profit opportunities in the field of social politics for smart private investors. We will [...] Read more.
Social impact bonds (SIBs) have been welcomed enthusiastically as a new funding tool for social innovation, yet also condemned as an instrument that neglects beneficiaries’ and taxpayers’ interests, opening profit opportunities in the field of social politics for smart private investors. We will shed a more analytical light on SIBs, assuming that, like any contract, SIBs try to align interests between partners with partly converging, partly diverging goals. Thus, it remains mainly a matter of negation, and non-profit social service providers as well as public agencies should avoid particular perils and pitfalls. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nonprofit Management in Transition)
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