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Predictors of Anxiety-Induced Sleep Disturbance among in-School Adolescents in Ghana: Evidence from the 2012 Global School-Based Health Survey

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School of Public Health, Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2007, Australia
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School of Public Health, University of Health and Allied Sciences, Ho PMB 31, Ghana
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Department of Sociology and Social Policy, Lingnan University, 8 Castle Peak Road, Tuen Mun, Hong Kong
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Department of Population and Health, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast PMB TF0494, Ghana
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College of Public Health, Medical and Veterinary Services, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD 4811, Australia
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Department of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast PMB TF0494, Ghana
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Department of Counselling Psychology, University of Education, Winneba, Winneba PMB 25, Ghana
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Neurocognition and Action-Biomechanics-Research Group, Faculty of Psychology and Sport Sciences, Bielefeld University, Postfach 10 01 31, 33501 Bielefeld, Germany
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Behav. Sci. 2021, 11(2), 20; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs11020020
Received: 21 December 2020 / Revised: 8 January 2021 / Accepted: 22 January 2021 / Published: 1 February 2021
(1) Background: Psychological problems of adolescents have become a global health and safety concern. Empirical evidence has shown that adolescents experience diverse mental health conditions (e.g., anxiety, depression, and emotional disorders). However, research on anxiety-induced sleep disturbance among in-school adolescents has received less attention, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. This study’s central focus was to examine factors associated with t anxiety-induced sleep disturbance among in-school adolescents in Ghana. (2) Methods: Analysis was performed using the 2012 Global School-based Health Survey (GSHS). A sample of 1342 in-school adolescents was included in the analysis. The outcome variable was anxiety-induced sleep disturbance reported during the past 12 months. Frequencies, percentages, chi-square, and multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted. Results from the multivariable logistic regression analysis were presented as crude and adjusted odds ratios at 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and with a statistical significance declared at p < 0.05. (3) Results: Adolescents who went hungry were more likely to report anxiety-induced sleep disturbance compared to their counterparts who did not report hunger (aOR = 1.68, CI = 1.10, 2.57). The odds of anxiety-induced sleep disturbance were higher among adolescents who felt lonely compared to those that never felt lonely (aOR = 2.82, CI = 1.98, 4.01). Adolescents who had sustained injury were more likely to have anxiety-induced sleep disturbance (aOR = 1.49, CI = 1.03, 2.14) compared to those who had no injury. Compared to adolescents who never had suicidal ideations, those who reported experiencing suicidal ideations had higher odds of anxiety-induced sleep disturbance (aOR = 1.68, CI = 1.05, 2.71). (4) Conclusions: Anxiety-induced sleep disturbance among in-school adolescents were significantly influenced by the psychosocial determinants such as hunger, loneliness, injury, and suicidal ideation in this study. The findings can help design appropriate interventions through effective strategies (e.g., early school-based screening, cognitive-behavioral therapy, face-face counseling services) to reduce psychosocial problems among in-school adolescents in Ghana. View Full-Text
Keywords: Ghana; in-school adolescents; hunger; loneliness; cognitive-behavioral; suicidal ideations; therapy Ghana; in-school adolescents; hunger; loneliness; cognitive-behavioral; suicidal ideations; therapy
MDPI and ACS Style

Ahinkorah, B.O.; Aboagye, R.G.; Arthur-Holmes, F.; Seidu, A.-A.; Frimpong, J.B.; Budu, E.; Amoako, B.M.; Hagan, J.E., Jr. Predictors of Anxiety-Induced Sleep Disturbance among in-School Adolescents in Ghana: Evidence from the 2012 Global School-Based Health Survey. Behav. Sci. 2021, 11, 20. https://doi.org/10.3390/bs11020020

AMA Style

Ahinkorah BO, Aboagye RG, Arthur-Holmes F, Seidu A-A, Frimpong JB, Budu E, Amoako BM, Hagan JE Jr. Predictors of Anxiety-Induced Sleep Disturbance among in-School Adolescents in Ghana: Evidence from the 2012 Global School-Based Health Survey. Behavioral Sciences. 2021; 11(2):20. https://doi.org/10.3390/bs11020020

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ahinkorah, Bright O., Richard G. Aboagye, Francis Arthur-Holmes, Abdul-Aziz Seidu, James B. Frimpong, Eugene Budu, Bernard M. Amoako, and John E. Hagan Jr. 2021. "Predictors of Anxiety-Induced Sleep Disturbance among in-School Adolescents in Ghana: Evidence from the 2012 Global School-Based Health Survey" Behavioral Sciences 11, no. 2: 20. https://doi.org/10.3390/bs11020020

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