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Geosciences 2018, 8(10), 370; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences8100370

A Methodology for Long-Term Monitoring of Climate Change Impacts on Historic Buildings

1
Norwegian Institute for Cultural Heritage Research, Storgata 2, 0155 Oslo, Norway
2
Faculty of Architecture and Design, Department of Architecture and Technology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Alfred Getz vei 3, 7491 Trondheim, Norway
3
Department of Art History, Uppsala University, 752 36 Uppsala, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 9 July 2018 / Revised: 24 September 2018 / Accepted: 27 September 2018 / Published: 4 October 2018
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Abstract

A new methodology for long-term monitoring of climate change impacts on historic buildings and interiors has been developed. This paper proposes a generic framework for how monitoring programs can be developed and describes the planning and arrangement of a Norwegian monitoring campaign. The methodology aims to make it possible to establish a data-driven decision making process based on monitored decay related to climate change. This monitoring campaign includes 45 medieval buildings distributed over the entirety of Norway. Thirty-five of these buildings are dated to before 1537 and include wooden buildings as well as 10 medieval churches built in stone while the remaining 10 buildings are situated in the World Heritage sites of Bryggen, in Bergen on the west coast of Norway, and in Røros, which is a mining town in the inland of the country. The monitoring is planned to run for 30 to 50 years. It includes a zero-level registration and an interval-based registration system focused on relevant indicators, which will make it possible to register climate change-induced decay at an early stage. View Full-Text
Keywords: climate change; long-term monitoring; Norwegian protected buildings; medieval buildings; zero status; warning report climate change; long-term monitoring; Norwegian protected buildings; medieval buildings; zero status; warning report
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Haugen, A.; Bertolin, C.; Leijonhufvud, G.; Olstad, T.; Broström, T. A Methodology for Long-Term Monitoring of Climate Change Impacts on Historic Buildings. Geosciences 2018, 8, 370.

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