Next Article in Journal
Does the Low-Field MRI Appearance of Intraosseous STIR Hyperintensity in Equine Cadaver Limbs Change when Subjected to a Freeze-Thaw Process?
Previous Article in Journal
High Genetic Diversity of an Invasive Alien Species: Comparison between Fur-Farmed and Feral American Mink (Neovison vison) in China
Article

Abattoir Factors Influencing the Incidence of Dark Cutting in Australian Grain-Fed Beef

1
School of Environmental and Rural Science, Faculty of Science, Agriculture, Business and Law, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia
2
Animal Health Data, 177 Bennetts Road, Norman Park, QLD 4170, Australia
3
School of Agriculture and Food, Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC 3010, Australia
4
School of Mathematics and Statistics, Faculty of Science, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
5
Faculty of Biological Sciences, The University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Javier Álvarez-Rodríguez
Animals 2021, 11(2), 474; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11020474
Received: 11 January 2021 / Revised: 5 February 2021 / Accepted: 5 February 2021 / Published: 10 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Animal System and Management)
This study was conducted to generate a greater understanding of the abattoir factors that influence the incidence of dark cutting in Australian grain-fed beef. Elucidation of the factors that are associated with an increased risk of dark cutting will allow for the development of effective management strategies to be implemented to reduce dark cutting in feedlot cattle. This will increase profitability across the supply chain for both producers and abattoirs, whom need to collaborate for the minimization of dark cutting.
The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of carcass traits, lairage time and weather conditions during lairage and abattoir factors that impact the incidence of dark cutting in 142,228 grain-fed carcasses, as defined by Meat Standards Australia (MSA) guidelines. This study was conducted over a 12-month period analysing data from cattle that were supplied from seven feedlots and processed at three abattoirs. Abattoir data indicated that the average incidence of dark cutting within the study was 2.8%. Increased wind speeds (WSs) and rain during lairage at the abattoir was associated with an increased risk of dark cutting, whereas variation in ambient temperature and/or relative humidity did not influence dark cutting. Heavier carcasses with whiter fat, larger hump heights, more rib fat, higher marble scores and lower ossification had lower incidences of dark cutting. The factors abattoir, time in lairage, time to grading and grader within Abattoir had significant effects on the incidence of dark cutting. The results from this study suggest that reducing the time in lairage and increasing the time between slaughter and grading are the two major ways to reduce dark cutting in MSA carcasses. View Full-Text
Keywords: high pH; feedlot cattle; processing factors; dark meat; weather high pH; feedlot cattle; processing factors; dark meat; weather
MDPI and ACS Style

Steel, C.C.; Lees, A.M.; Bowler, D.; Gonzalez-Rivas, P.A.; Tarr, G.; Warner, R.D.; Dunshea, F.R.; Cowley, F.C.; McGilchrist, P. Abattoir Factors Influencing the Incidence of Dark Cutting in Australian Grain-Fed Beef. Animals 2021, 11, 474. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11020474

AMA Style

Steel CC, Lees AM, Bowler D, Gonzalez-Rivas PA, Tarr G, Warner RD, Dunshea FR, Cowley FC, McGilchrist P. Abattoir Factors Influencing the Incidence of Dark Cutting in Australian Grain-Fed Beef. Animals. 2021; 11(2):474. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11020474

Chicago/Turabian Style

Steel, Cameron C., Angela. M. Lees, D. Bowler, P. A. Gonzalez-Rivas, G. Tarr, R. D. Warner, F. R. Dunshea, Frances C. Cowley, and P. McGilchrist 2021. "Abattoir Factors Influencing the Incidence of Dark Cutting in Australian Grain-Fed Beef" Animals 11, no. 2: 474. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11020474

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop