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Co-Culture with Bifidobacterium catenulatum Improves the Growth, Gut Colonization, and Butyrate Production of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies

1
Department of Food and Nutrition, Research Institute of Ecology, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Korea
2
Institute of Health and Environment, Graduate School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Korea
3
Research Center, BIFIDO Co., Ltd., Hongcheon 25117, Korea
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Microorganisms 2020, 8(5), 788; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8050788
Received: 6 May 2020 / Revised: 22 May 2020 / Accepted: 23 May 2020 / Published: 25 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Gut Microbiota)
Faecalibacterium prausnitzii is a major commensal bacterium in the human gut. It produces short-chain fatty acids that promote intestinal health. However, the bacterium is extremely oxygen-sensitive, making it difficult to develop as a probiotic. To facilitate practical application of F. prausnitzii, we investigated factors that affect its growth and mammalian gut colonization. We evaluated cross-feeding interactions between F. prausnitzii and seven Bifidobacterium strains, and the anti-inflammatory properties of bacterial metabolites produced in co-culture, in vitro and in vivo. Co-culture of F. prausnitzii and Bifidobacterium catenulatum, with fructooligosaccharides as an energy source, resulted in the greatest viable cell-count and butyrate production increases. Further, the co-culture supernatant reduced the amount of proinflammatory cytokines produced by HT-29 cells and RAW 264.7 macrophages, an effect that was similar to that of butyrate. Furthermore, feeding mice both Faecalibacterium and Bifidobacterium enhanced F. prausnitzii gut colonization. Finally, feeding the co-culture supernatant decreased interleukin 8 levels in the colon and increased butyrate levels in the cecum in the dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis mouse model. These observations indicate that the Faecalibacterium-Bifidobacterium co-culture exerts an anti-inflammatory effect by promoting F. prausnitzii survival and short-chain fatty acid production, with possible implications for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. View Full-Text
Keywords: Faecalibacterium prausnitzii; Bifidobacterium catenulatum; cross-feeding; anti-inflammation; butyrate Faecalibacterium prausnitzii; Bifidobacterium catenulatum; cross-feeding; anti-inflammation; butyrate
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kim, H.; Jeong, Y.; Kang, S.; You, H.J.; Ji, G.E. Co-Culture with Bifidobacterium catenulatum Improves the Growth, Gut Colonization, and Butyrate Production of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies. Microorganisms 2020, 8, 788. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8050788

AMA Style

Kim H, Jeong Y, Kang S, You HJ, Ji GE. Co-Culture with Bifidobacterium catenulatum Improves the Growth, Gut Colonization, and Butyrate Production of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies. Microorganisms. 2020; 8(5):788. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8050788

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kim, Heejung, Yunju Jeong, Sini Kang, Hyun J. You, and Geun E. Ji. 2020. "Co-Culture with Bifidobacterium catenulatum Improves the Growth, Gut Colonization, and Butyrate Production of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies" Microorganisms 8, no. 5: 788. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8050788

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