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Comment published on 3 October 2019, see Microorganisms 2019, 7(10), 417.
Open AccessReview

Shiga-Toxin Producing Escherichia Coli in Brazil: A Systematic Review

1
Institute of Chemistry, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21941-909 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
2
Agronomy and Animal Science College, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, 78060-900 Cuiabá-Mato Grosso, Brazil
3
Nutrition College, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, 78060-900 Cuiabá-Mato Grosso, Brazil
4
Department of Food Technology, Faculdade de Veterinária, Universidade Federal Fluminense, 24230-340 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
5
Alberta Agriculture and Forestry, #100-5401 1st Ave. S, Lethbridge, AB T1J 4V6, Canada
6
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lethbridge Research and Development Centre, 5403 1st Avenue South, Lethbridge, AB T1J 4B1, Canada
7
National Institute of Health Quality Control, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, 21040-900 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Microorganisms 2019, 7(5), 137; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms7050137
Received: 29 March 2019 / Revised: 1 May 2019 / Accepted: 4 May 2019 / Published: 16 May 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli)
Shiga-toxin producing E. coli (STEC) can cause serious illnesses, including hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. This is the first systematic review of STEC in Brazil, and will report the main serogroups detected in animals, food products and foodborne diseases. Data were obtained from online databases accessed in January 2019. Papers were selected from each database using the Mesh term entries. Although no human disease outbreaks in Brazil related to STEC has been reported, the presence of several serogroups such as O157 and O111 has been verified in animals, food, and humans. Moreover, other serogroups monitored by international federal agencies and involved in outbreak cases worldwide were detected, and other unusual strains were involved in some isolated individual cases of foodborne disease, such as serotype O118:H16 and serogroup O165. The epidemiological data presented herein indicates the presence of several pathogenic serogroups, including O157:H7, O26, O103, and O111, which have been linked to disease outbreaks worldwide. As available data are concentrated in the Sao Paulo state and almost completely lacking in outlying regions, epidemiological monitoring in Brazil for STEC needs to be expanded and food safety standards for this pathogen should be aligned to that of the food safety standards of international bodies. View Full-Text
Keywords: STEC; food microbiology; food-borne diseases; VTEC; EHEC; shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli; bloody diarrhea STEC; food microbiology; food-borne diseases; VTEC; EHEC; shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli; bloody diarrhea
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Castro, V.S.; Figueiredo, E.E.S.; Stanford, K.; McAllister, T.; Conte-Junior, C.A. Shiga-Toxin Producing Escherichia Coli in Brazil: A Systematic Review. Microorganisms 2019, 7, 137.

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