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Article

Bacterial Succession during Vermicomposting of Silver Wattle (Acacia dealbata Link)

1
CIBIO-InBIO, Centro de Investigação em Biodiversidade e Recursos Genéticos, Campus Agrário de Vairão, Vairão, Universidade do Porto, 4485-661 Porto, Portugal
2
Computational Biology Institute, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052, USA
3
Department of Biostatistics & Bioinformatics, Milken Institute School of Public Health, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052, USA
4
Grupo de Ecoloxía Animal (GEA), Universidade de Vigo, E-36310 Vigo, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Giovanni Vallini
Microorganisms 2022, 10(1), 65; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms10010065
Received: 25 November 2021 / Revised: 24 December 2021 / Accepted: 27 December 2021 / Published: 29 December 2021
Vermicomposting is the process of organic waste degradation through interactions between earthworms and microbes. A variety of organic wastes can be vermicomposted, producing a nutrient-rich final product that can be used as a soil biofertilizer. Giving the prolific invasive nature of the Australian silver wattle Acacia dealbata Link in Europe, it is important to find alternatives for its sustainable use. However, optimization of vermicomposting needs further comprehension of the fundamental microbial processes. Here, we characterized bacterial succession during the vermicomposting of silver wattle during 56 days using the earthworm species Eisenia andrei. We observed significant differences in α- and β-diversity between fresh silver wattle (day 0) and days 14 and 28, while the bacterial community seemed more stable between days 28 and 56. Accordingly, during the first 28 days, a higher number of taxa experienced significant changes in relative abundance. A microbiome core composed of 10 amplicon sequence variants was identified during the vermicomposting of silver wattle (days 14 to 56). Finally, predicted functional profiles of genes involved in cellulose metabolism, nitrification, and salicylic acid also changed significantly during vermicomposting. This study, hence, provides detailed insights of the bacterial succession occurring during vermicomposting of the silver wattle and the characteristics of its final product as a sustainable plant biofertilizer. View Full-Text
Keywords: 16S rRNA; earthworms; metataxonomics; microbiome; vermicompost 16S rRNA; earthworms; metataxonomics; microbiome; vermicompost
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MDPI and ACS Style

Rosado, D.; Pérez-Losada, M.; Aira, M.; Domínguez, J. Bacterial Succession during Vermicomposting of Silver Wattle (Acacia dealbata Link). Microorganisms 2022, 10, 65. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms10010065

AMA Style

Rosado D, Pérez-Losada M, Aira M, Domínguez J. Bacterial Succession during Vermicomposting of Silver Wattle (Acacia dealbata Link). Microorganisms. 2022; 10(1):65. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms10010065

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rosado, Daniela, Marcos Pérez-Losada, Manuel Aira, and Jorge Domínguez. 2022. "Bacterial Succession during Vermicomposting of Silver Wattle (Acacia dealbata Link)" Microorganisms 10, no. 1: 65. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms10010065

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