Next Article in Journal
Characterization of an MLP Homologue from Haemaphysalis longicornis (Acari: Ixodidae) Ticks
Next Article in Special Issue
Updated Management Guidelines for Clostridioides difficile in Paediatrics
Previous Article in Journal
Genotyping Echinococcus multilocularis in Human Alveolar Echinococcosis Patients: An EmsB Microsatellite Analysis
Open AccessCommunication

Occurrence of Blastocystis in Patients with Clostridioides difficile Infection

1
Grupo de Investigaciones Microbiológicas de la Universidad del Rosario (GIMUR), Departamento de Biología, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad del Rosario, Bogotá 110221, Colombia
2
Molecular Biology and Immunology Department, Fundación Instituto de Inmunología de Colombia (FIDIC), Bogotá 110221, Colombia
3
School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universidad del Rosario, Bogotá 110221, Colombia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Pathogens 2020, 9(4), 283; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens9040283
Received: 30 January 2020 / Revised: 9 April 2020 / Accepted: 9 April 2020 / Published: 14 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diagnosis and Treatment of Clostridioides difficile)
Clostridiodes difficile comprises a public-health threat that has been understudied in Colombia. Hypervirulent strains of C. difficile harbor multiple toxins, can be easily spread, and can have their onset of disease within healthcare facilities (HCFO) and the community (CO). Studies have shown that a disrupted microbiota (e.g., dysbiosis) may allow C. difficile infection (CDI). It has been suggested that dysbiosis prevents colonization by the anaerobic eukaryote Blastocystis, possibly due to an increase in luminal oxygen tension. No study has found co-occurrence of CDI and Blastocystis. Therefore, we aimed to determine the frequencies of C. difficile and Blastocystis infection/colonization in 220 diarrheal fecal samples. Molecular detection by PCR for both microorganisms was performed, with descriptive analyses of four variables (CDI detection, determination of C. difficile toxigenic profiles, Blastocystis detection, and patient site of onset). We demonstrate a significant association between the presence of Blastocystis and CDI, with coinfection found in 61 patients, and show a high frequency of CDI among both HCFO and CO groups. Our results of coinfection frequencies could support hypotheses that suggest Blastocystis can adapt to dysbiosis and oxidative stress. Further, the presence of toxigenic C. difficile occurring outside healthcare facilities shown here raises the alarm for community wide spread. View Full-Text
Keywords: C. difficile; Blastocystis; dysbiosis; toxigenic C. difficile; community onset; healthcare facility onset C. difficile; Blastocystis; dysbiosis; toxigenic C. difficile; community onset; healthcare facility onset
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Vega, L.; Herrera, G.; Muñoz, M.; Patarroyo, M.A.; Ramírez, J.D. Occurrence of Blastocystis in Patients with Clostridioides difficile Infection. Pathogens 2020, 9, 283.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop