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Article

Mosquitoes Know No Borders: Surveillance of Potential Introduction of Aedes Species in Southern Québec, Canada

1
Direction des Risques Biologiques et de la Santé au Travail, Institut National de Santé Publique du Québec, 190 Boulevard Crémazie Est, Montréal, QC H2P 1E2, Canada
2
Groupe de Recherche en Épidémiologie des Zoonoses et Santé Publique (GREZOSP), Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Montréal, 3200 Rue Sicotte, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC J2S 2M2, Canada
3
Bureau D’information et D’études en Santé des Populations, Institut National de Santé Publique du Québec, 190 Boulevard Crémazie Est, Montréal, QC H2P 1E2, Canada
4
Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, 1020 Pine Ave. West, Montréal, QC H3A 1A2, Canada
5
Public Health Risk Sciences Division, National Microbiology Laboratory, Public Health Agency of Canada, 3200 Rue Sicotte, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC J2S 2M2, Canada
6
Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Montréal, 3200 Rue Sicotte, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC J2S 2M2, Canada
7
Zoonotic Diseases and Special Pathogens Division, National Microbiology Laboratory, Public Health Agency of Canada, 1015 Arlington St., Winnipeg, MB R3E 3M4, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Shared first-authorship.
Academic Editor: Claude Saegerman
Pathogens 2021, 10(8), 998; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10080998
Received: 22 July 2021 / Revised: 3 August 2021 / Accepted: 4 August 2021 / Published: 7 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases)
Current climatic conditions limit the distribution of Aedes (Stegomyia) albopictus (Skuse, Diptera: Culicidae) in the north, but predictive climate models suggest this species could establish itself in southern Canada by 2040. A vector of chikungunya, dengue, yellow fever, Zika and West Nile viruses, the Ae. Albopictus has been detected in Windsor, Ontario since 2016. Given the potential public health implications, and knowing that Aedes spp. can easily be introduced by ground transportation, this study aimed to determine if specimens could be detected, using an adequate methodology, in southern Québec. Mosquitoes were sampled in 2016 and 2017 along the main roads connecting Canada and the U.S., using Biogent traps (Sentinel-2, Gravide Aedes traps) and ovitraps. Overall, 24 mosquito spp. were captured, excluding Ae. Albopictus, but detecting one Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti (Skuse) specimen (laid eggs). The most frequent species among captured adults were Ochlerotatus triseriatus, Culex pipiens complex, and Ochlerotatus japonicus (31.0%, 26.0%, and 17.3%, respectively). The present study adds to the increasing number of studies reporting on the range expansions of these mosquito species, and suggests that ongoing monitoring, using multiple capture techniques targeting a wide range of species, may provide useful information to public health with respect to the growing risk of emerging mosquito-borne diseases in southern Canada. View Full-Text
Keywords: invasive mosquito species; public health; Aedes albopictus; Aedes aegypti; Ochlerotatus japonicus; Ochlerotatus triseriatus invasive mosquito species; public health; Aedes albopictus; Aedes aegypti; Ochlerotatus japonicus; Ochlerotatus triseriatus
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MDPI and ACS Style

Lowe, A.-M.; Forest-Bérard, K.; Trudel, R.; Lo, E.; Gamache, P.; Tandonnet, M.; Kotchi, S.-O.; Leighton, P.; Dibernardo, A.; Lindsay, R.; Ludwig, A. Mosquitoes Know No Borders: Surveillance of Potential Introduction of Aedes Species in Southern Québec, Canada. Pathogens 2021, 10, 998. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10080998

AMA Style

Lowe A-M, Forest-Bérard K, Trudel R, Lo E, Gamache P, Tandonnet M, Kotchi S-O, Leighton P, Dibernardo A, Lindsay R, Ludwig A. Mosquitoes Know No Borders: Surveillance of Potential Introduction of Aedes Species in Southern Québec, Canada. Pathogens. 2021; 10(8):998. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10080998

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lowe, Anne-Marie, Karl Forest-Bérard, Richard Trudel, Ernest Lo, Philippe Gamache, Matthieu Tandonnet, Serge-Olivier Kotchi, Patrick Leighton, Antonia Dibernardo, Robbin Lindsay, and Antoinette Ludwig. 2021. "Mosquitoes Know No Borders: Surveillance of Potential Introduction of Aedes Species in Southern Québec, Canada" Pathogens 10, no. 8: 998. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10080998

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