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Article

Altered Nasal Microbiota Composition Associated with Development of Polyserositis by Mycoplasma hyorhinis

1
IRTA, Centre de Recerca en Sanitat Animal (CReSA, IRTA-UAB), Campus de la Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Spain
2
OIE Collaborating Centre for the Research and Control of Emerging and Re-Emerging Swine Diseases in Europe (IRTA-CReSA), 08193 Bellaterra, Spain
3
Departamento de Ciencia Animal, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingeniería Agraria (ETSEA), Universidad de Lleida, 25198 Lleida, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Jaime Gómez-Laguna
Pathogens 2021, 10(5), 603; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10050603
Received: 1 April 2021 / Revised: 10 May 2021 / Accepted: 12 May 2021 / Published: 14 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbiota and Respiratory Diseases in Pigs)
Fibrinous polyserositis in swine farming is a common pathological finding in nursery animals. The differential diagnosis of this finding should include Glaesserella parasuis (aetiological agent of Glässer’s disease) and Mycoplasma hyorhinis, among others. These microorganisms are early colonizers of the upper respiratory tract of piglets. The composition of the nasal microbiota at weaning was shown to constitute a predisposing factor for the development of Glässer’s disease. Here, we unravel the role of the nasal microbiota in the subsequent systemic infection by M. hyorhinis, and the similarities and differences with Glässer’s disease. Nasal samples from farms with recurrent problems with polyserositis associated with M. hyorhinis (MH) or Glässer’s disease (GD) were included in this study, together with healthy control farms (HC). Nasal swabs were taken from piglets in MH farms at weaning, before the onset of the clinical outbreaks, and were submitted to 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing (V3–V4 region). These sequences were analyzed together with sequences from similar samples previously obtained in GD and HC farms. Animals from farms with disease (MH and GD) had a nasal microbiota with lower diversity than those from the HC farms. However, the composition of the nasal microbiota of the piglets from these disease farms was different, suggesting that divergent microbiota imbalances may predispose the animals to the two systemic infections. We also found variants of the pathogens that were associated with the farms with the corresponding disease, highlighting the importance of studying the microbiome at strain-level resolution. View Full-Text
Keywords: porcine polyserositis; nasal microbiota; Mycoplasma hyorhinis; microbial diversity; 16S rRNA gene; Glässer’s disease porcine polyserositis; nasal microbiota; Mycoplasma hyorhinis; microbial diversity; 16S rRNA gene; Glässer’s disease
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MDPI and ACS Style

Blanco-Fuertes, M.; Correa-Fiz, F.; Fraile, L.; Sibila, M.; Aragon, V. Altered Nasal Microbiota Composition Associated with Development of Polyserositis by Mycoplasma hyorhinis. Pathogens 2021, 10, 603. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10050603

AMA Style

Blanco-Fuertes M, Correa-Fiz F, Fraile L, Sibila M, Aragon V. Altered Nasal Microbiota Composition Associated with Development of Polyserositis by Mycoplasma hyorhinis. Pathogens. 2021; 10(5):603. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10050603

Chicago/Turabian Style

Blanco-Fuertes, Miguel, Florencia Correa-Fiz, Lorenzo Fraile, Marina Sibila, and Virginia Aragon. 2021. "Altered Nasal Microbiota Composition Associated with Development of Polyserositis by Mycoplasma hyorhinis" Pathogens 10, no. 5: 603. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10050603

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