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Racial Discrimination Stress, School Belonging, and School Racial Composition on Academic Attitudes and Beliefs among Black Youth

T. Denny Sanford School of Social and Family Dynamics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA
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Soc. Sci. 2020, 9(11), 191; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci9110191
Received: 27 August 2020 / Revised: 24 October 2020 / Accepted: 26 October 2020 / Published: 28 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Racial Justice in Learning Contexts)
It is important to consider racialized experiences and proximal indicators of academic success for Black youth when understanding the achievement gap. Acknowledging that racial discrimination is detrimental for the academic success of Black youth, this study extended previous research by examining the influence of racial discrimination stress. Using hierarchical regression analysis and a moderated moderation model, this study examined racial discrimination stress and school belonging as predictors of academic attitudes and beliefs among 344 Black youth (M age = 15.6). Additionally, we examined the interactive effects of school belonging as a buffer for racial discrimination stress, with particular focus on majority White schools. Analyses revealed that school belonging was linked with academic competence, academic efficacy, and academic skepticism. Furthermore, school belonging buffered the impact of racial discrimination stress on academic efficacy among Black youth in majority White schools. These findings highlight the co-occurrence of risk and protective factors among Black youth and demonstrate the additive influence of school racial composition on academic attitudes and beliefs. The practical and theoretical implications of these findings demonstrate the crucial role of school context in understanding risk and protective factors for the academic attitudes and beliefs of Black youth. View Full-Text
Keywords: black youth; racial discrimination stress; school belonging; academic attitudes; school racial composition black youth; racial discrimination stress; school belonging; academic attitudes; school racial composition
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MDPI and ACS Style

Morris, K.S.; Seaton, E.K.; Iida, M.; Lindstrom Johnson, S. Racial Discrimination Stress, School Belonging, and School Racial Composition on Academic Attitudes and Beliefs among Black Youth. Soc. Sci. 2020, 9, 191.

AMA Style

Morris KS, Seaton EK, Iida M, Lindstrom Johnson S. Racial Discrimination Stress, School Belonging, and School Racial Composition on Academic Attitudes and Beliefs among Black Youth. Social Sciences. 2020; 9(11):191.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Morris, Kamryn S.; Seaton, Eleanor K.; Iida, Masumi; Lindstrom Johnson, Sarah. 2020. "Racial Discrimination Stress, School Belonging, and School Racial Composition on Academic Attitudes and Beliefs among Black Youth" Soc. Sci. 9, no. 11: 191.

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