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Article

The Effect of Elastic Strain and Small Plastic Deformation on Tensile Strength of a Lean Al–Mg–Si Alloy

1
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), N-7491 Trondheim, Norway
2
Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway
3
SINTEF Industry, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway
4
Hydro Aluminium R&D Sunndal, N-6600 Sunndalsøra, Norway
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Metals 2019, 9(12), 1276; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9121276
Received: 1 November 2019 / Revised: 21 November 2019 / Accepted: 25 November 2019 / Published: 28 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aluminum Alloys and Aluminum Matrix Composites)
Al–Mg–Si alloys are usually formed into their final shape by rolling or extrusion. After extrusion, the aluminium profiles are usually straightened, causing the material to be subjected to a small plastic deformation. This study demonstrates the positive effect on strength that can be obtained from such small deformation levels or from only elastically straining the material. Elastic straining of a lean Al–Mg–Si alloy, when performed immediately after solution heat treatment, enhances the material yield strength after artificial ageing to T6. Transmission electron microscopy shows that this effect can be attributed to a higher number density and finer dispersion of the age-hardening precipitate needles. Furthermore, introducing a small plastic deformation of 1% after solution heat treatment results in a comparable strength increase to elastically straining the material. In this case, however, the strength increase is due to the increased dislocation density, which compensates for a lower density of precipitate needles. Finally, by combining plastic deformation with a succeeding elastic strain, we demonstrate how elastic strain can cause an on-set of dislocation cell formation in this material. View Full-Text
Keywords: Al–Mg–Si alloys; TEM; elastic strain; plastic deformation; precipitation Al–Mg–Si alloys; TEM; elastic strain; plastic deformation; precipitation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mørtsell, E.A.; Westermann, I.; Marioara, C.D.; Pedersen, K.O.; Andersen, S.J.; Røyset, J.; Holmedal, B.; Holmestad, R. The Effect of Elastic Strain and Small Plastic Deformation on Tensile Strength of a Lean Al–Mg–Si Alloy. Metals 2019, 9, 1276. https://doi.org/10.3390/met9121276

AMA Style

Mørtsell EA, Westermann I, Marioara CD, Pedersen KO, Andersen SJ, Røyset J, Holmedal B, Holmestad R. The Effect of Elastic Strain and Small Plastic Deformation on Tensile Strength of a Lean Al–Mg–Si Alloy. Metals. 2019; 9(12):1276. https://doi.org/10.3390/met9121276

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mørtsell, Eva A., Ida Westermann, Calin D. Marioara, Ketill O. Pedersen, Sigmund J. Andersen, Jostein Røyset, Bjørn Holmedal, and Randi Holmestad. 2019. "The Effect of Elastic Strain and Small Plastic Deformation on Tensile Strength of a Lean Al–Mg–Si Alloy" Metals 9, no. 12: 1276. https://doi.org/10.3390/met9121276

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