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In Biomedicine, Thin Is Still In: Obesity Surveillance among Racialized, (Im)migrant, and Female Bodies

School of Health Policy and Management, York University, Toronto, M3J 1P3, Canada
Societies 2019, 9(3), 59; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc9030059
Received: 3 July 2019 / Revised: 6 August 2019 / Accepted: 11 August 2019 / Published: 15 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social Inequality and Human Rights in a Digital World)
PDF [358 KB, uploaded 15 August 2019]

Abstract

Currently there is a plethora of research literature which constructs obesity as an alarming new global pandemic associated with a multitude of acute and chronic diseases rooted in lifestyle factors. Although most of these claims related to obesity are well accepted in the research community, some challenges remain. For instance, lifestyle factors only partially explain the risks of developing obesity. In this paper, I advocated for greater caution in interpreting some of the medical claims of obesity due to the epistemological and methodological assumptions that inform certain groups of obesity researchers. While most of the literature has reported lifestyle factors and behavior modification as the major mechanisms to achieving health and wellbeing, a few scholars have raised issues about structural factors.
Keywords: feminist political economy; racialized bodies; obese other; public health; social determinants of health feminist political economy; racialized bodies; obese other; public health; social determinants of health
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Syed, I.U. In Biomedicine, Thin Is Still In: Obesity Surveillance among Racialized, (Im)migrant, and Female Bodies. Societies 2019, 9, 59.

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