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Article

Endophytic Isaria javanica pf185 Persists after Spraying and Controls Myzus persicae (Hemiptera: Aphididae) and Colletotrichum acutatum (Glomerellales: Glomerellaceae) in Pepper

1
Agricultural Microbiology Division, National Institute of Agricultural Sciences, RDA, Wanju 565-851, Korea
2
Department of Agriculture and Natural Resources (ANR), UC Davis, Cooperative Extension, 2156, Sierra Way, Ste C, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401, USA
3
The Korea Agro-Materials Research Organization (KARO), 703, Farmer’s Building 92, Suseong-ro, Paldal-gu, Suwon-si 16432, Korea
4
Planning and Coordination Division, National Institute of Agricultural Sciences, RDA, Wanju 565-851, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Rosemary Collier
Insects 2021, 12(7), 631; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12070631
Received: 24 May 2021 / Revised: 6 July 2021 / Accepted: 7 July 2021 / Published: 12 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Collection Integrated Pest Management Strategies for Horticultural Crops)
The green peach aphid (Myzus persicae) and the phytopathogenic fungus Colletotrichum acutatum cause significant losses in a wide variety of crops. To efficiently protect their crops, farmers use chemical pesticides, but this kind of practice is not sustainable because of its negative effects on the environment. This study suggests an environmentally friendly method such as the use of the endophytic Isaria javanica pf185 in pepper plants. Suspension of the endophytic fungus (EF) was sprayed on plants under cage while those same leaves were sampled and assessed under laboratory conditions. The EF can both penetrate inside the leaf tissues and survive on the surface of the leaf after five weeks. The suspension showed an evident insecticidal efficiency against M. persicae and a lower one against C. acutatum. Therefore, its antifungal efficiency against C. acutatum was not correlated with weather patterns. Authors recommend I. javanica pf185 as a potential biocontrol agent against M. persicae and C. acutatum.
This study endeavored to sustainably control aphids and anthracnose after spraying endophytic Isaria javanica pf185 under field conditions. Under two different tents; one batch of seedlings was sprayed with a 107 conidia/mL I. javanica pf185 suspension; while another was sprayed with 0.05% Tween 80® in distilled water. Six leaf discs from the top; middle; and bottom part of the plant canopy were weekly collected and placed on moistened filter paper in a Petri dish for insecticidal and antifungal bioassays against Myzus persicae and Colletotrichum acutatum. Differences were noticed from the 18th day after spraying with mortality (86.67 ± 0.57% versus 36.67 ± 0.64%) and leaf damage (13.45 ± 0.03% versus 41.18 ± 0.06%) on fungus-treated and controlled, respectively. The corrected insecticidal efficacy was 20.43, 39.82, 72.32, 66.43 and 70.04%, while the corrected fungicidal efficacy was 26.07, 38.01, 53.35, 29.08 and 41.81% during five successive weeks. A positive correlation was evident between insecticidal efficacy and relative humidity (r2 = 0.620) and temperature (r2 = 0.424), respectively. No correlation was found between antifungal activity and relative humidity (r2 = 0.061) and temperature (r2 = 0), respectively. The entomopathogenic fungus survived on leaf surface area and in tissues after spraying. View Full-Text
Keywords: insecticidal; antifungal; hemocytometer; isolate; aphid mortality; leaf damage percent insecticidal; antifungal; hemocytometer; isolate; aphid mortality; leaf damage percent
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MDPI and ACS Style

Bocco, R.; Lee, M.; Kim, D.; Ahn, S.; Park, J.-W.; Lee, S.-Y.; Han, J.-H. Endophytic Isaria javanica pf185 Persists after Spraying and Controls Myzus persicae (Hemiptera: Aphididae) and Colletotrichum acutatum (Glomerellales: Glomerellaceae) in Pepper. Insects 2021, 12, 631. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12070631

AMA Style

Bocco R, Lee M, Kim D, Ahn S, Park J-W, Lee S-Y, Han J-H. Endophytic Isaria javanica pf185 Persists after Spraying and Controls Myzus persicae (Hemiptera: Aphididae) and Colletotrichum acutatum (Glomerellales: Glomerellaceae) in Pepper. Insects. 2021; 12(7):631. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12070631

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bocco, Roland, Moran Lee, Dayeon Kim, Seongho Ahn, Jin-Woo Park, Sang-Yeob Lee, and Ji-Hee Han. 2021. "Endophytic Isaria javanica pf185 Persists after Spraying and Controls Myzus persicae (Hemiptera: Aphididae) and Colletotrichum acutatum (Glomerellales: Glomerellaceae) in Pepper" Insects 12, no. 7: 631. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12070631

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