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Sustainable Management Methods of Orchard Insect Pests
Article

A Minor Role of Host Fruit on the Parasitic Performance of Aganaspis daci (Hymenoptera: Figitidae) on Medfly Larvae

1
Unidad Asociada de Entomología IVIA-CIB CSIC, Centro de Protección Vegetal y Biotecnología, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Agrarias (IVIA), Ctra. Moncada a Náquera km 4.5, 46113 Moncada, Spain
2
Unidad de Zoología, Facultad de Biología, Universidad de Salamanca, 37007 Salamanca, Spain
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Department of Crop Protection, Biological Control and Ecosystem Services, Instituto Murciano de Investigación y Desarrollo Agrario y Alimentario, C/Mayor s/n, La Alberca, 30150 Murcia, Spain
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High Agronomic Institute of Chott-Mariem, University of Sousse, Chott-Mariem 4042, Tunisia
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Smurfit Institute of Genetics, Trinity College, University of Dublin, Dublin2 D02 VF25 Dublin, Ireland
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Integrative Systems Biology Group, Institute for Plant Molecular and Cell Biology (IBMCP) from the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), Polytechnic University of Valencia (UPV), 46022 Valencia, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Both authors should be considered first author.
Academic Editors: Lukasz L. Stelinski and Brian T. Forschler
Insects 2021, 12(4), 345; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12040345
Received: 9 February 2021 / Revised: 25 March 2021 / Accepted: 10 April 2021 / Published: 13 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Management Methods for Orchard Insect Pests)
The medfly, Ceratitis capitata, is one of the main pests of citrus and other fruits worldwide. One of the most promising parasitoids for the control of this pest is Aganaspis daci, which has been recently discovered in the Mediterranean Basin. The development of fruit pests is strongly affected by the host fruit and this is also expected to affect the parasitic performance of their natural enemies. Therefore, in this study, we measured both the olfactory and parasitic response of female Aganaspis daci to different fruit species that can host medfly larvae. This parasitoid was more attracted to apples and uninfested fruit and showed very similar parasitic activity among the different tested fruits. However, the parasitic performance differed significantly depending on the environmental conditions under which the assays were conducted, showing good results in the laboratory and a much poorer performance in greenhouse trials. We conclude that A. daci may be a good candidate to control the medfly in a range of different crops, but only when climatic conditions allow normal activity of this species.
Host fruit is known to strongly affect the performance of both fruit pests and their potential natural enemies. This is particularly important in the control of tephritid fruit flies, whose larvae develop inside the fruit and thus create a set of foraging problems for parasitoids. In the present study, we assessed the response of female Aganaspis daci (Weld) (Hymenoptera: Figitidae), one of the most promising parasitoids for tephritid biocontrol in the Mediterranean Basin, to different potential host fruit species. We measured the olfactory response to medfly-infested and uninfested fruits, and several biological parameters of A. daci when different infested fruits were offered under both laboratory and greenhouse conditions. Our results showed that this parasitoid was significantly more attracted to apples and uninfested fruit. Moreover, parasitic activity was similar among the tested fruits under both conditions, showing very high values in the laboratory and a much poorer performance when conditions were variable. This suggests that A. daci may be a good candidate to be included in mass releases against the medfly regardless of the affected crop, but only when climate conditions are not expected to hinder its normal activity. View Full-Text
Keywords: host fruit; Aganaspis daci; Ceratitis capitata; medfly; parasitic performance; olfactory testing; population reduction; host fruit preference; inundative releases; hotspot control host fruit; Aganaspis daci; Ceratitis capitata; medfly; parasitic performance; olfactory testing; population reduction; host fruit preference; inundative releases; hotspot control
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MDPI and ACS Style

de Pedro, L.; Harbi, A.; Tormos, J.; Sabater-Muñoz, B.; Beitia, F. A Minor Role of Host Fruit on the Parasitic Performance of Aganaspis daci (Hymenoptera: Figitidae) on Medfly Larvae. Insects 2021, 12, 345. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12040345

AMA Style

de Pedro L, Harbi A, Tormos J, Sabater-Muñoz B, Beitia F. A Minor Role of Host Fruit on the Parasitic Performance of Aganaspis daci (Hymenoptera: Figitidae) on Medfly Larvae. Insects. 2021; 12(4):345. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12040345

Chicago/Turabian Style

de Pedro, Luis, Ahlem Harbi, José Tormos, Beatriz Sabater-Muñoz, and Francisco Beitia. 2021. "A Minor Role of Host Fruit on the Parasitic Performance of Aganaspis daci (Hymenoptera: Figitidae) on Medfly Larvae" Insects 12, no. 4: 345. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12040345

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