Next Article in Journal
Towards Integrated Pest and Pollinator Management in Intensive Pear Cultivation: A Case Study from Belgium
Previous Article in Journal
The Transcriptomic Landscape of Molecular Effects after Sublethal Exposure to Dinotefuran on Apis mellifera
Article

Identification of Pheromone Components of Plagionotus detritus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), and Attraction of Conspecifics, Competitors, and Natural Enemies to the Pheromone Blend

1
Plant Protection Institute, Agricultural Research Centre, ELKH, H-1022 Budapest, Hungary
2
Department of Entomology, Kansas State University, 123 W. Waters Hall, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA
3
Department of Entomology, Institute of Plant Protection, Hungarian University of Agriculture and Life Sciences, H-1118 Budapest, Hungary
4
Brainfarma Industria Química e Farmacêutica S.A, Barueri 06400-000, Brazil
5
Department of Forest Protection, Forest Research Institute, University of Sopron, H-3232 Mátrafüred, Hungary
6
Department of Entomology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA
7
Department of Entomology, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Angel Guerrero
Insects 2021, 12(10), 899; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12100899
Received: 8 September 2021 / Revised: 28 September 2021 / Accepted: 29 September 2021 / Published: 2 October 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Insect Physiology, Reproduction and Development)
The longhorn beetle, Plagionotus detritus (L.), occurs throughout Europe and into the Middle East. Our principal aim was to identify the male-produced aggregation-sex attractant pheromone of this species. A pheromone-based monitoring system could support plant protection in areas where it might become a pest and natural conservation in areas where it is endangered. Headspace volatiles were collected from live beetles and analyzed by coupled gas chromatography-electroantennogram detection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Two components of the extracts that elicited responses from antennae of P. detritus, (R)-3-hydroxyhexan-2-one and (S)-2-hydroxyoctan-3-one were identified, (±)-3-hydroxyhexan-2-one was purchased, and (S)-2-hydroxyoctan-3-one was synthesized, and field-tested. The blend of the two components attracted both sexes of P. detritus in field bioassays. Unexpectedly, a predatory clerid beetle, Clerus mutillarius F., was also attracted by both of the synthetic compounds. Another longhorn beetle species, Xylotrechus antilope Schönh. was significantly attracted to traps baited with (S)-2-hydroxyoctan-3-one alone or the blend containing this compound. These results show that the pheromone components and combinations play key roles in longhorn beetle life history and ecology, and the community of species in which they live.
(1) Background: The principal aim of our work was to identify pheromone components for Plagionotus detritus (L.) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), which could be exploited for developing a pheromone-based monitoring system for the complementary purposes of plant protection in areas where it might become a pest, and natural conservation in areas where it is rare or endangered. (2) Methods: Collection and analysis of headspace volatiles were carried out with field-collected beetles. Bioactive volatile compounds identified [(R)-3-hydroxyhexan-2-one and (S)-2-hydroxyoctan-3-one] from extracts of males were purchased [(±)-3-hydroxyhexan-2-one], and synthesized [(S)-2-hydroxyoctan-3-one] and field-tested. Electroantennogram assays showed that antennae of the predatory beetle Clerus mutillarius F. (Coleoptera: Cleridae) also responded to the synthetic compounds. (3) Results: A two-component aggregation-sex pheromone consisting of (R)-3-hydroxyhexan-2-one and (S)-2-hydroxyoctan-3-one was identified for P. detritus. (±)-3-hydroxyhexan-2-one and (S)-2-hydroxyoctan-3-one attracted adults of P. detritus in field bioassays. Adults of the clerid C. mutillarius also were attracted to both compounds. The cerambycid Xylotrechus antilope Schönh was significantly attracted to traps baited with (S)-2-hydroxyoctan-3-one alone or the blend containing this compound. (4) Conclusions: Our data confirmed that 3-hydroxyhexan-2-one and 2-hydroxyoctan-3-one are male-produced pheromone components for P. detritus. These results show that both intraspecific and interspecific communication may play key roles in longhorn beetle life history and ecology, with closely and more distantly related species eavesdropping on each other’s signals. View Full-Text
Keywords: headspace sampling; (R)-3-hydroxyhexan-2-one; (S)-2-hydroxyoctan-3-one; aggregation-sex pheromone; Clytini; predator; Plagionotus detritus; Clerus mutillarius; Xylotrechus antilope headspace sampling; (R)-3-hydroxyhexan-2-one; (S)-2-hydroxyoctan-3-one; aggregation-sex pheromone; Clytini; predator; Plagionotus detritus; Clerus mutillarius; Xylotrechus antilope
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Imrei, Z.; Domingue, M.J.; Lohonyai, Z.; Moreira, J.A.; Bálintné Csonka, É.; Fail, J.; Csóka, G.; Hanks, L.M.; Tóth, M.; Millar, J.G. Identification of Pheromone Components of Plagionotus detritus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), and Attraction of Conspecifics, Competitors, and Natural Enemies to the Pheromone Blend. Insects 2021, 12, 899. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12100899

AMA Style

Imrei Z, Domingue MJ, Lohonyai Z, Moreira JA, Bálintné Csonka É, Fail J, Csóka G, Hanks LM, Tóth M, Millar JG. Identification of Pheromone Components of Plagionotus detritus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), and Attraction of Conspecifics, Competitors, and Natural Enemies to the Pheromone Blend. Insects. 2021; 12(10):899. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12100899

Chicago/Turabian Style

Imrei, Zoltán, Michael J. Domingue, Zsófia Lohonyai, Jardel A. Moreira, Éva Bálintné Csonka, József Fail, György Csóka, Lawrence M. Hanks, Miklós Tóth, and Jocelyn G. Millar. 2021. "Identification of Pheromone Components of Plagionotus detritus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), and Attraction of Conspecifics, Competitors, and Natural Enemies to the Pheromone Blend" Insects 12, no. 10: 899. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12100899

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop