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Article

A Fitness-Fatigue Model of Performance in Peripheral Artery Disease: Predicted and Measured Effects of a Pain-Free Exercise Program

1
Department of Neuroscience and Rehabilitation, University of Ferrara, Via Luigi Borsari 46, 44121 Ferrara, Italy
2
PhD Program in Environmental Sustainability and Wellbeing, Department of Humanistic Studies, University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara, Italy
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Department of Environmental Sciences and Prevention, University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara, Italy
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Department of Nursing, Instituto Maimónides de Investigación Biomédica de Córdoba, 14005 Córdoba, Spain
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Department of Nursing, Universidad de Córdoba, 14004 Córdoba, Spain
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Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University Hospital of Ferrara, 44124 Ferrara, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Amelia Filippelli
J. Pers. Med. 2022, 12(3), 397; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm12030397
Received: 25 January 2022 / Revised: 25 February 2022 / Accepted: 3 March 2022 / Published: 4 March 2022
Banister impulse-response (IR) model estimates the performance in response to the training impulses (TRIMPs). In 100 patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD), we tested by an IR model the predictability of the effects of a 6-month structured home-based exercise program. The daily TRIMPs obtained from prescribed walking speed, relative intensity and time of exercise determined the fitness-fatigue components of performance. The estimated performance values, calculated from the baseline 6-min and pain-free walking distance (6MWD and PFWD, respectively) were compared with values measured at visits through regression models. Interval pain-free walking at controlled speed prescribed during circa-monthly hospital visits (5 ± 1) was safely performed at home with good adherence (92% of scheduled sessions, 144 ± 25 km walked in 50 ± 8 training hours). The mean TRIMP rose throughout the program from 276 to 601 a.u. The measured 6MWD and PFWD values increased (+33 m and +121 m, respectively) showing a good fit with those estimated by the IR model (6MWD: R2 0.81; PFWD: R2 0.68) and very good correspondence (correlation coefficients: 0.91 to 0.95), without sex differences. The decay of performance without training was estimated at 18 ± 3 weeks. In PAD, an IR model predicted the walking performance following a pain-free exercise program. IR models may contribute to design and verify personalized training programs. View Full-Text
Keywords: exercise therapy; rehabilitation; peripheral artery disease; impulse-response; gender differences; training exercise therapy; rehabilitation; peripheral artery disease; impulse-response; gender differences; training
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MDPI and ACS Style

Lamberti, N.; Piva, G.; Businaro, F.; Caruso, L.; Crepaldi, A.; Lòpez-Soto, P.J.; Manfredini, F. A Fitness-Fatigue Model of Performance in Peripheral Artery Disease: Predicted and Measured Effects of a Pain-Free Exercise Program. J. Pers. Med. 2022, 12, 397. https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm12030397

AMA Style

Lamberti N, Piva G, Businaro F, Caruso L, Crepaldi A, Lòpez-Soto PJ, Manfredini F. A Fitness-Fatigue Model of Performance in Peripheral Artery Disease: Predicted and Measured Effects of a Pain-Free Exercise Program. Journal of Personalized Medicine. 2022; 12(3):397. https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm12030397

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lamberti, Nicola, Giovanni Piva, Federico Businaro, Lorenzo Caruso, Anna Crepaldi, Pablo Jesùs Lòpez-Soto, and Fabio Manfredini. 2022. "A Fitness-Fatigue Model of Performance in Peripheral Artery Disease: Predicted and Measured Effects of a Pain-Free Exercise Program" Journal of Personalized Medicine 12, no. 3: 397. https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm12030397

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