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An Experimental Study for the Remediation of Industrial Waste Water Using a Combination of Low Cost Mineral Raw Materials

1
Section of Earth Materials, Department of Geology, University of Patras, 265 04 Patras, Greece
2
Physical and Geological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Universiti Brunei Darussalam, Jalan Tungku Link, Gadong BE1410, Bandar Seri Begawan, Brunei Darussalam
3
Laboratory of Hydrogeology, Department of Geology, University of Patras, 265 04 Patras, Greece
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Minerals 2019, 9(4), 207; https://doi.org/10.3390/min9040207
Received: 2 March 2019 / Revised: 13 March 2019 / Accepted: 27 March 2019 / Published: 30 March 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Acid Mine Drainage Recovery)
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Abstract

This paper investigates an alternative use of sterile aggregate materials which may arise from various construction applications in conjunction with other low-cost mineral raw materials to remediate the acid mine drainage phenomenon. This study is based on the combination of unprocessed mineral raw materials, as well as on the basic concept of the cyclic economy where the conversion of a waste into a raw material for another application can be achieved. In this study, in order to examine the remediation, in lab scale, of the drainage waste water of Agios Philippos mine, an experimental electrically continuous flow-driven forced device was constructed, enriching the research gap relative to this type of remediation approach. Through this experimental device, the use of certain mixes of mineral raw materials (serpentinite, andesite, magnesite, peat, and biochar) was studied. Our results focus on the impact of the studied mineral raw materials and especially on their synergy on the water purification potential under continuous water flow operation. Using the new 7-day experimental electrically continuous flow-driven forced device with certain mixes of mineral raw materials, the increase of pH values from 3.00 to 6.82 was achieved. Moreover, with use of the experimental device, the removal of toxic load was achieved, and more specifically the concentration of Fe was decreased from 6149 to 1300 ppb, Cu from 8847 to 35 ppb, and Zn from 285,458 to 50,000 ppb. View Full-Text
Keywords: sterile aggregates; remediation of waste water; peat; biochar sterile aggregates; remediation of waste water; peat; biochar
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Petrounias, P.; Rogkala, A.; Giannakopoulou, P.P.; Tsikouras, B.; Lampropoulou, P.; Kalaitzidis, S.; Hatzipanagiotou, K.; Lambrakis, N.; Christopoulou, M.A. An Experimental Study for the Remediation of Industrial Waste Water Using a Combination of Low Cost Mineral Raw Materials. Minerals 2019, 9, 207.

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