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The Chemical Evolution from Older (323–318 Ma) towards Younger Highly Evolved Tin Granites (315–314 Ma)—Sources and Metal Enrichment in Variscan Granites of the Western Erzgebirge (Central European Variscides, Germany)

1
Institut für Mineralogie, TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Brennhausgasse 14, D-09599 Freiberg/Sachsen, Germany
2
Institut für Geowissenschaften, Goethe Universität Frankfurt, Altenhoeferallee 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main, Germany
3
Saxonian Geological Survey, Halsbrücker Str. 31a, D-09599 Freiberg, Germany
4
Swedish Museum of Natural History, Box 50007, SE-1045 Stockholm, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Minerals 2019, 9(12), 769; https://doi.org/10.3390/min9120769
Received: 23 October 2019 / Revised: 4 December 2019 / Accepted: 10 December 2019 / Published: 11 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Mineral Geochemistry and Geochronology 2019)
The sources and critical enrichment processes for granite related tin ores are still not well understood. The Erzgebirge represents one of the classical regions for tin mineralization. We investigated the four largest plutons from the Western Erzgebirge (Germany) for the geochemistry of bulk rocks and autocrystic zircons and relate this information to their intrusion ages. The source rocks of the Variscan granites were identified as high-grade metamorphic rocks based on the comparison of Hf-O isotope data on zircons, the abundance of xenocrystic zircon ages as well as Nd and Hf model ages. Among these rocks, restite is the most likely candidate for later Variscan melts. Based on the evolution with time, we could reconstruct enrichment factors for tin and tungsten starting from the protoliths (575 Ma) that were later converted to high-grade metamorphic rocks (340 Ma) and served as sources for the older biotite granites (323–318 Ma) and the tin granites (315–314 Ma). This evolution involved a continuous enrichment of both tin and tungsten with an enrichment factor of ~15 for tin and ~7 for tungsten compared to the upper continental crust (UCC). Ore level concentrations (>10–100 times enrichment) were achieved only in the greisen bodies and dykes by subsequent hydrothermal processes. View Full-Text
Keywords: tin granites; crustal melts; S-type granites; zircon; hafnium isotopes; oxygen isotopes; greisen; Erzgebirge; granite source tin granites; crustal melts; S-type granites; zircon; hafnium isotopes; oxygen isotopes; greisen; Erzgebirge; granite source
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Tichomirowa, M.; Gerdes, A.; Lapp, M.; Leonhardt, D.; Whitehouse, M. The Chemical Evolution from Older (323–318 Ma) towards Younger Highly Evolved Tin Granites (315–314 Ma)—Sources and Metal Enrichment in Variscan Granites of the Western Erzgebirge (Central European Variscides, Germany). Minerals 2019, 9, 769.

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